Military police investigator perspectives of a new self-reflective approach to strengthening resilience: a qualitative study

Monique Crane, Frances Rapport, Joanne Callen, Danny Boga, Daniel Gucciardi, Laura Sinclair

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

In this study, we explored participants’ experiences of a unique form of resilience training. The aims of this study were to obtain rich information about the participants’ experience of the resilience intervention based on adaptive self-reflection, their ability to report the private stress experience and coping efforts when faced with a stressor, their perceptions of training applicability to other contexts, and whether the training was able to encourage the reappraisal of stressors as growth opportunities. A qualitative design was employed with a sample of 21 investigator trainees from the Australian Defence Force School of Policing. Following implementation of the program, trainees provided written responses to seven open ended questions and participated in one focus group designed to embellish understanding of the survey answers. The analysis identified both strengths and limitations in the way respondents were able to recall and report on their private stress experience and coping efforts and several domains where the resilience training seemed to have its effects. Moreover, the respondents reported increased confidence in their ability to manage stressors in the future, recognition of stress in others and the potential to assist them, and a changed view of stress as an opportunity for personal development. Based on these findings, potential improvements in the training materials are recommended. Moreover, the findings suggest coping and emotion regulatory self-reflection may encourage the application of useful strategies and reinforce personal resilient capacities and coping self-efficacy.
LanguageEnglish
Pages384-396
Number of pages13
JournalMilitary Psychology
Volume31
Issue number5
Early online date14 Aug 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

Fingerprint

Police
resilience
Aptitude
police
Research Personnel
Military
coping
reflexivity
trainee
Self Efficacy
Focus Groups
experience
Emotions
ability
self-efficacy
Growth
emotion
confidence
Surveys and Questionnaires
school

Keywords

  • psychological stress
  • military personnel
  • psychology
  • military
  • resilience

Cite this

@article{7fdbe2da3ece45babe31224aeb917889,
title = "Military police investigator perspectives of a new self-reflective approach to strengthening resilience: a qualitative study",
abstract = "In this study, we explored participants’ experiences of a unique form of resilience training. The aims of this study were to obtain rich information about the participants’ experience of the resilience intervention based on adaptive self-reflection, their ability to report the private stress experience and coping efforts when faced with a stressor, their perceptions of training applicability to other contexts, and whether the training was able to encourage the reappraisal of stressors as growth opportunities. A qualitative design was employed with a sample of 21 investigator trainees from the Australian Defence Force School of Policing. Following implementation of the program, trainees provided written responses to seven open ended questions and participated in one focus group designed to embellish understanding of the survey answers. The analysis identified both strengths and limitations in the way respondents were able to recall and report on their private stress experience and coping efforts and several domains where the resilience training seemed to have its effects. Moreover, the respondents reported increased confidence in their ability to manage stressors in the future, recognition of stress in others and the potential to assist them, and a changed view of stress as an opportunity for personal development. Based on these findings, potential improvements in the training materials are recommended. Moreover, the findings suggest coping and emotion regulatory self-reflection may encourage the application of useful strategies and reinforce personal resilient capacities and coping self-efficacy.",
keywords = "psychological stress, military personnel, psychology, military, resilience",
author = "Monique Crane and Frances Rapport and Joanne Callen and Danny Boga and Daniel Gucciardi and Laura Sinclair",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.1080/08995605.2019.1645537",
language = "English",
volume = "31",
pages = "384--396",
journal = "Military Psychology",
issn = "0899-5605",
publisher = "Routledge, Taylor and Francis Group",
number = "5",

}

Military police investigator perspectives of a new self-reflective approach to strengthening resilience : a qualitative study. / Crane, Monique; Rapport, Frances; Callen, Joanne; Boga, Danny; Gucciardi, Daniel; Sinclair, Laura.

In: Military Psychology, Vol. 31, No. 5, 2019, p. 384-396.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Military police investigator perspectives of a new self-reflective approach to strengthening resilience

T2 - Military Psychology

AU - Crane, Monique

AU - Rapport, Frances

AU - Callen, Joanne

AU - Boga, Danny

AU - Gucciardi, Daniel

AU - Sinclair, Laura

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - In this study, we explored participants’ experiences of a unique form of resilience training. The aims of this study were to obtain rich information about the participants’ experience of the resilience intervention based on adaptive self-reflection, their ability to report the private stress experience and coping efforts when faced with a stressor, their perceptions of training applicability to other contexts, and whether the training was able to encourage the reappraisal of stressors as growth opportunities. A qualitative design was employed with a sample of 21 investigator trainees from the Australian Defence Force School of Policing. Following implementation of the program, trainees provided written responses to seven open ended questions and participated in one focus group designed to embellish understanding of the survey answers. The analysis identified both strengths and limitations in the way respondents were able to recall and report on their private stress experience and coping efforts and several domains where the resilience training seemed to have its effects. Moreover, the respondents reported increased confidence in their ability to manage stressors in the future, recognition of stress in others and the potential to assist them, and a changed view of stress as an opportunity for personal development. Based on these findings, potential improvements in the training materials are recommended. Moreover, the findings suggest coping and emotion regulatory self-reflection may encourage the application of useful strategies and reinforce personal resilient capacities and coping self-efficacy.

AB - In this study, we explored participants’ experiences of a unique form of resilience training. The aims of this study were to obtain rich information about the participants’ experience of the resilience intervention based on adaptive self-reflection, their ability to report the private stress experience and coping efforts when faced with a stressor, their perceptions of training applicability to other contexts, and whether the training was able to encourage the reappraisal of stressors as growth opportunities. A qualitative design was employed with a sample of 21 investigator trainees from the Australian Defence Force School of Policing. Following implementation of the program, trainees provided written responses to seven open ended questions and participated in one focus group designed to embellish understanding of the survey answers. The analysis identified both strengths and limitations in the way respondents were able to recall and report on their private stress experience and coping efforts and several domains where the resilience training seemed to have its effects. Moreover, the respondents reported increased confidence in their ability to manage stressors in the future, recognition of stress in others and the potential to assist them, and a changed view of stress as an opportunity for personal development. Based on these findings, potential improvements in the training materials are recommended. Moreover, the findings suggest coping and emotion regulatory self-reflection may encourage the application of useful strategies and reinforce personal resilient capacities and coping self-efficacy.

KW - psychological stress

KW - military personnel

KW - psychology

KW - military

KW - resilience

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85070937975&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/08995605.2019.1645537

DO - 10.1080/08995605.2019.1645537

M3 - Article

VL - 31

SP - 384

EP - 396

JO - Military Psychology

JF - Military Psychology

SN - 0899-5605

IS - 5

ER -