Modern and post-modern cities and ethnic residential segregation: Is Los Angeles different?

Ron Johnston*, Michael Poulsen, James Forrest

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Dear and others associated with the 'Los Angeles School of Urbanism' have presented a series of challenging ideas regarding changes in urban form as a consequence of the shift from modernism to post-modernism. Some of those challenges relate to a city's ethnic diversity and residential segregation, with Los Angeles presented as a paradigm exemplar of an emerging new urban form. This paper evaluates the arguments that Los Angeles in particular, and Californian metropolitan areas more generally, differ from metropolitan areas elsewhere in the United States in the nature of ethnic residential segregation there. Regression analyses provide little support for the argument, but graphical analyses show that although Los Angeles does not differ from the general, US-wide trends, its almost unique nature in terms of its ethnic diversity means that it clearly stands out as a place with a different pattern shared by very few others.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)318-330
Number of pages13
JournalGeoforum
Volume37
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2006

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