Modifying Bedtime Disruptions in Children using Stimulus Control and Contingency Management Techniques

Matthew R. Sanders*, Bill Bor, Mark Dadds

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

47 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The present study examined the effect of a bedtime management programme which incorporated both stimulus control and contingency management procedures on the level of bedtime disruption in children. Using a multiple baseline across subjects design each of four children (ranging in age from 2–5 years) were sequentially introduced to the treatment program, which was implemented by the child's parents each night. In addition the study sought to determine whether direct treatment of bedtime disruption would be associated with any negative side effects. Systematic observational data revealed that the Bedtime Management Program was effective in reducing bedtime disruptions in all subjects and the improvements sustained during a 2-month follow-up. No evidence suggests that treatment resulted in negative side effects. The implications of the results for behavioural parent training are discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)130-141
Number of pages12
JournalBehavioural Psychotherapy
Volume12
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1984
Externally publishedYes

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