Monte Carlo and experimental evaluation of accuracy and noise properties of two scatter correction methods for SPECT

Yuuichiro Narita*, Stefan Eberl, Hidehiro Iida, Brian F. Hutton, Michael Braun, Takashi Nakamura, George Bautovich

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    71 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Scatter correction is a prerequisite for quantitative SPECT, but potentially increases noise. Monte Carlo simulations (EGS4) and physical phantom measurements were used to compare accuracy and noise properties of two scatter correction techniques: the triple-energy window (TEW), and the transmission dependent convolution subtraction (TDCS) techniques. Two scatter functions were investigated for TDCS: (i) the originally proposed mono-exponential function (TDCS(mono) and (ii) an exponential plus Gaussian scatter function (TDCS(Gauss)) demonstrated to be superior from our Monte Carlo simulations. Signal to noise ratio (S/N) and accuracy were investigated in cylindrical phantoms and a chest phantom. Results from each method were compared to the true primary counts (simulations), or known activity concentrations (phantom studies). 99mTc was used in all cases. The optimized TDCS(Gauss) method overall performed best, with an accuracy of better than 4% for all simulations and physical phantom studies. Maximum errors for TEW and TDCS(mono) of -30 and -22%, respectively, were observed in the heart chamber of the simulated chest phantom. TEW had the worst S/N ratio of the three techniques. The S/N ratios of the two TDCS methods were similar and only slightly lower than those of simulated true primary data. Thus, accurate quantitation can be obtained with TDCS(Gauss), with a relatively small reduction in S/N ratio.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)2481-2496
    Number of pages16
    JournalPhysics in Medicine and Biology
    Volume41
    Issue number11
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Nov 1996

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