Mood and balance are associated with free-living physical activity of people after stroke residing in the community

Matar A. Alzahrani, Catherine M. Dean, Louise Ada, Simone Dorsch, Colleen G. Canning

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Purpose. To determine which characteristics are most associated with free-living physical activity in community-dwelling ambulatory people after stroke. Method. Factors (age, gender, side of stroke, time since stroke, BMI, and spouse), sensory-motor impairments (weakness, contracture, spasticity, coordination, proprioception, and balance), and non-sensory-motor impairments (cognition, language, perception, mood, and confidence) were collected on 42 people with chronic stroke. Free-living physical activity was measured using an activity monitor and reported as time on feet and activity counts. Results. Univariate analysis showed that balance and mood were correlated with time on feet (r=0.42, 0.43, P < 0.01) and also with activity counts (r=0.52, 0.54, P < 0.01). Stepwise multiple regression showed that mood and balance accounted for 25% of the variance in time on feet and 40% of the variance in activity counts. Conclusions. Mood and balance are associated with free-living physical activity in ambulatory people after stroke residing in the community.

LanguageEnglish
Article number470648
Pages1-8
Number of pages8
JournalStroke Research and Treatment
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

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Stroke
Exercise
Foot
Independent Living
Proprioception
Age Factors
Contracture
Spouses
Cognition
Language

Bibliographical note

Copyright the Author(s) [2012]. Version archived for private and non-commercial use with the permission of the author/s and according to publisher conditions. For further rights please contact the publisher.

Cite this

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title = "Mood and balance are associated with free-living physical activity of people after stroke residing in the community",
abstract = "Purpose. To determine which characteristics are most associated with free-living physical activity in community-dwelling ambulatory people after stroke. Method. Factors (age, gender, side of stroke, time since stroke, BMI, and spouse), sensory-motor impairments (weakness, contracture, spasticity, coordination, proprioception, and balance), and non-sensory-motor impairments (cognition, language, perception, mood, and confidence) were collected on 42 people with chronic stroke. Free-living physical activity was measured using an activity monitor and reported as time on feet and activity counts. Results. Univariate analysis showed that balance and mood were correlated with time on feet (r=0.42, 0.43, P < 0.01) and also with activity counts (r=0.52, 0.54, P < 0.01). Stepwise multiple regression showed that mood and balance accounted for 25{\%} of the variance in time on feet and 40{\%} of the variance in activity counts. Conclusions. Mood and balance are associated with free-living physical activity in ambulatory people after stroke residing in the community.",
author = "Alzahrani, {Matar A.} and Dean, {Catherine M.} and Louise Ada and Simone Dorsch and Canning, {Colleen G.}",
note = "Copyright the Author(s) [2012]. Version archived for private and non-commercial use with the permission of the author/s and according to publisher conditions. For further rights please contact the publisher.",
year = "2012",
doi = "10.1155/2012/470648",
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Mood and balance are associated with free-living physical activity of people after stroke residing in the community. / Alzahrani, Matar A.; Dean, Catherine M.; Ada, Louise; Dorsch, Simone; Canning, Colleen G.

In: Stroke Research and Treatment, 2012, p. 1-8.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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T1 - Mood and balance are associated with free-living physical activity of people after stroke residing in the community

AU - Alzahrani, Matar A.

AU - Dean, Catherine M.

AU - Ada, Louise

AU - Dorsch, Simone

AU - Canning, Colleen G.

N1 - Copyright the Author(s) [2012]. Version archived for private and non-commercial use with the permission of the author/s and according to publisher conditions. For further rights please contact the publisher.

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - Purpose. To determine which characteristics are most associated with free-living physical activity in community-dwelling ambulatory people after stroke. Method. Factors (age, gender, side of stroke, time since stroke, BMI, and spouse), sensory-motor impairments (weakness, contracture, spasticity, coordination, proprioception, and balance), and non-sensory-motor impairments (cognition, language, perception, mood, and confidence) were collected on 42 people with chronic stroke. Free-living physical activity was measured using an activity monitor and reported as time on feet and activity counts. Results. Univariate analysis showed that balance and mood were correlated with time on feet (r=0.42, 0.43, P < 0.01) and also with activity counts (r=0.52, 0.54, P < 0.01). Stepwise multiple regression showed that mood and balance accounted for 25% of the variance in time on feet and 40% of the variance in activity counts. Conclusions. Mood and balance are associated with free-living physical activity in ambulatory people after stroke residing in the community.

AB - Purpose. To determine which characteristics are most associated with free-living physical activity in community-dwelling ambulatory people after stroke. Method. Factors (age, gender, side of stroke, time since stroke, BMI, and spouse), sensory-motor impairments (weakness, contracture, spasticity, coordination, proprioception, and balance), and non-sensory-motor impairments (cognition, language, perception, mood, and confidence) were collected on 42 people with chronic stroke. Free-living physical activity was measured using an activity monitor and reported as time on feet and activity counts. Results. Univariate analysis showed that balance and mood were correlated with time on feet (r=0.42, 0.43, P < 0.01) and also with activity counts (r=0.52, 0.54, P < 0.01). Stepwise multiple regression showed that mood and balance accounted for 25% of the variance in time on feet and 40% of the variance in activity counts. Conclusions. Mood and balance are associated with free-living physical activity in ambulatory people after stroke residing in the community.

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