Morphological usage and awareness in children with and without specific language impairment

Karen M. Smith-Lock*

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    16 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    In order to investigate the relationship between oral language usage and morphological awareness, 5- to 7-year-old children with specific language impairment (SLI) were compared to age-matched (AM) and language-matched (LM) comparison groups on a variety of measures requiring metalinguistic skill. These included sentence completion (involving real and nonsense words); comprehension of inflected non-words; response to morphological errors (including judgment, identification, and repair), and deliberate creation of grammatical violations. Overall, the SLI children performed significantly worse than their AM peers and were indistinguishable from younger LM children, suggesting that morphological awareness is more closely allied with oral language than with general cognitive/chronological development.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)161-185
    Number of pages25
    JournalAnnals of Dyslexia
    Volume45
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jan 1995

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