Mousetraps and how to avoid them: the convergence of utilitarian and scientific cases for limiting the mouse model in biomedical research

Cynthia Townley, Brett A. Lidbury

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Abstract

The primary aim of biomedical research is to discover and develop new knowledge to advance human medicine. Frequently a ‘mouse model’ is taken to be a necessary step towards understanding a disease, biological mechanism or intervention. We argue for caution with respect to the mouse model: theoretical reasons, meta-analyses of empirical data, and viable alternatives all support a more restricted use of animals in laboratories than that which is presented in current practice. On its own terms, a utilitarian scientific justification for using animals in biomedical research converges more closely with welfarist claims than is usually recognised.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)59-74
Number of pages16
JournalBetween the species
Volume15
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2012

Bibliographical note

Copyright 2012 Between the Species. Version archived for private and non-commercial use with the permission of the author/s and according to publisher and copyright conditions. For further rights please contact the publisher.

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