MRI findings are more common in selected patients with acute low back pain than controls?

Mark Hancock*, Chris Maher, Petra MacAskill, Jane Latimer, Walter Kos, Justin Pik

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose The purpose of this study is to investigate if lumbar disc pathology identified on MRI scans is more common in patients with acute, likely discogenic, low back pain than matched controls. Methods We compared rates of MRI findings between 30 cases with low back pain and 30 pain-free controls. Cases were patients presenting for care with likely discogenic low back pain (demonstrated centralisation with repeated movement testing), of moderate intensity and with minimal past history of back pain. Controls were matched for age, gender and past history of back pain. Cases and controls underwent MRI scanning which was read for the presence of a range of MRI findings by two blinded assessors. Results The presence of disc degeneration, modic changes and disc herniation significantly altered the odds of a participant being a case or control. For example subjects were 5.2 times more likely to be a case than a control when disc degeneration grade of C3 was present, and 6.0 times more likely with modic changes. The presence of a high-intensity zone or annular tear was found to significantly alter odds for one assessor but not the other assessor. Conclusion MRI findings including disc degeneration, modic changes and herniation are more common in selected people with current acute (likely discogenic) low back pain than in controls without current low back pain. Further investigation of the value of MRI findings as prognostic factors and as treatment effect modifiers is required to assess the potential clinical importance of these findings.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)240-246
Number of pages7
JournalEuropean Spine Journal
Volume21
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'MRI findings are more common in selected patients with acute low back pain than controls?'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this