Multiple-choice questions in the Humanities

A case study of Peerwise in a first-year Popular Music course

Adrian Renzo*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The web-based system Peerwise allows students to submit their own multiple-choice questions (MCQs) about course content, complete with distractors and an explanation of the 'correct' answer. Other students can then attempt their peers' questions and provide feedback on the quality of each question. To date, Peerwise has been used mostly in subjects where typical MCQs have a finite number of correct answers. This paper â€" a work-in-progress â€" suggests that Peerwise is potentially useful in units with a more 'discursive' orientation, such as MUS100, offered at Macquarie University, Australia. The system provides a good forum in which students can test each other on both lower-order and higher-order tasks. Future research will explore the efficacy of the tool across multiple iterations of the unit MUS100.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of ASCILITE 2014 - Annual Conference of the Australian Society for Computers in Tertiary Education
EditorsBronwyn Hegarty, Jenny McDonald, Swee-Kin Loke
Place of PublicationDunedin, New Zealand
PublisherASCILITE
Pages560-564
Number of pages5
Publication statusPublished - 2014
Event31st Annual Conference of the Australian Society for Computers in Tertiary Education, ASCILITE 2014 - Dunedin, New Zealand
Duration: 23 Nov 201426 Nov 2014

Other

Other31st Annual Conference of the Australian Society for Computers in Tertiary Education, ASCILITE 2014
CountryNew Zealand
CityDunedin
Period23/11/1426/11/14

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  • Cite this

    Renzo, A. (2014). Multiple-choice questions in the Humanities: A case study of Peerwise in a first-year Popular Music course. In B. Hegarty, J. McDonald, & S-K. Loke (Eds.), Proceedings of ASCILITE 2014 - Annual Conference of the Australian Society for Computers in Tertiary Education (pp. 560-564). Dunedin, New Zealand: ASCILITE.