Mycobacterial nucleoid associated proteins

An added dimension in gene regulation

Nastassja L. Kriel*, James Gallant, Niël van Wyk, Paul van Helden, Samantha L. Sampson, Robin M. Warren, Monique J. Williams

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Nucleoid associated proteins (NAPs) are known organisers of chromosomal structure and regulators of transcriptional expression. The number of proposed NAPs in mycobacteria are significantly lower than the number identified in other organisms. An interesting feature of mycobacterial NAPs is their low sequence similarity with those in other species, a property that has hindered their identification. In this review, we discuss the current evidence for the proposed classification of six mycobacterial proteins, Lsr2, EspR, mIHF, HupB, MDP2 and NapM, as NAPs in mycobacterial species with an emphasis on their roles in modulating chromosome structure and transcriptional regulation. In addition, we highlight the technical difficulties associated with investigating and providing evidence for the classification of proteins as NAPs in mycobacteria. We also address the role of mycobacterial NAPs as mediators of stress responses and highlight the recent developments aimed at targeting NAP-DNA interactions for the development of novel anti-TB drugs.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)169-177
Number of pages9
JournalTuberculosis
Volume108
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2018
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • chromosome structure
  • gene regulation
  • mycobacterium tuberculosis
  • nucleoid associated proteins
  • transcription

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    Kriel, N. L., Gallant, J., van Wyk, N., van Helden, P., Sampson, S. L., Warren, R. M., & Williams, M. J. (2018). Mycobacterial nucleoid associated proteins: An added dimension in gene regulation. Tuberculosis, 108, 169-177. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tube.2017.12.004