Nectar production and floral characteristics of Tropaeolum majus L. grown in ambient and elevated carbon dioxide

Janet C. Lake*, Lesley Hughes

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Tropaeolum majus (nasturtiums) were grown from seed in growth cabinets, under 380 and 750 ppmy CO2. Elevated CO2 significantly increased nectar secretion rate, both in flowers milked of nectar daily and in once sampled, 3-d-old flowers. Elevated CO2 did not affect time to flowering, total number of flowers produced, pollen to ovule ratio, or the total or individual concentrations of nectar amino acids. The dry weight and longevity of individual flowers was also unchanged. Nectar sugar content was unchanged by elevated CO2 in a subset of flowers used to assess the 3-d-old nectar volume. This subset did not show the same increase in nectar volume under elevated CO2 as the full set, resulting in the concentration of sugars remaining unchanged. Overall, the quantity rather than the quality of the nectar changed under elevated CO2 while flower characteristics remained constant, implying that the identity of pollinators may remain the same while foraging behaviour (e.g. number of Visits per plant, distance travelled) may change in the future.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)535-541
Number of pages7
JournalAnnals of Botany
Volume84
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 1999

Keywords

  • Amino acids
  • Elevated CO
  • Floral characteristics
  • Nasturtiums
  • Nectar
  • Phenology
  • Pollinator-plant interactions
  • Tropaeolum majus

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