Negotiating the hyphens in a culture of surveillance: embodied surveillance and the representation of Muslim adolescence in Anglophone YA fiction

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

In the era defined by the war on terror, border security, and increased Western cultural anxiety, the discourses of politics, race, and gender influence the representation of non-normative bodies, notably in the signification of female Muslim adolescent bodies as sites of political, racial, and cultural contestation within a culture of surveillance. Mirroring Western society, Anglophone YA fiction typically privileges white normative portrayals of Western adolescence. Fostered in a culture of suspicion, the revitalized orientalist tropes depict Muslim adolescent girls as bodies to “save,” “fear,” and “Westernize.” An emerging group of YA novels presents a substantive challenge to this tradition by seeking to disrupt patriarchal, white normative conceptualizations of Western adolescence. Through an analysis of Randa Abdel-Fattah’s When Michael Met Mina and S. K. Ali’s Saints and Misfits, this article explores the ways in which the female Muslim adolescent body is constructed as a product of surveillance, problematizing the experiences of embodied surveillance and the complexities of being identified as a part of racialized surveillant assemblages.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)122-143
Number of pages22
JournalJeunesse: Young People, Texts, Cultures
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 27 Aug 2020

Keywords

  • Muslim
  • YA Fiction
  • Saints and Misfits
  • embodied surveillance
  • When Michael Met Mina

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Negotiating the hyphens in a culture of surveillance: embodied surveillance and the representation of Muslim adolescence in Anglophone YA fiction'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this