Neoliberalism as language policy

Ingrid Piller*, Jinhyun Cho

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    225 Citations (Scopus)
    69 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    This article explores how an economic ideology-neoliberalism-serves as a covert language policy mechanism pushing the global spread of English. Our analysis builds on a case study of the spread of English as a medium of instruction (MoI) in South Korean higher education. The Asian financial crisis of 1997/98 was the catalyst for a set of socioeconomic transformations that led to the imposition of competitiveness as a core value. Competition is heavily structured through a host of testing, assessment, and ranking mechanisms, many of which explicitly privilege English as a terrain where individual and societal worth are established. University rankings are one such mechanism structuring competition and constituting a covert form of language policy. One ranking criterion-internationalization-is particularly easy to manipulate and strongly favors English MoI. We conclude by reflecting on the social costs of elevating competitiveness to a core value enacted on the terrain of language choice. (English as a global language, globalization, higher education, medium of instruction (MoI), neoliberalism, South Korea, university rankings).

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)23-44
    Number of pages22
    JournalLanguage in Society
    Volume42
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Feb 2013

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