Neuronal network disintegration

common pathways linking neurodegenerative diseases

Rebekah M. Ahmed, Emma M. Devenney, Muireann Irish, Arne Ittner, Sharon Naismith, Lars M. Ittner, Jonathan D. Rohrer, Glenda M. Halliday, Andrew Eisen*, John R. Hodges, Matthew C. Kiernan

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

42 Citations (Scopus)
4 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Neurodegeneration refers to a heterogeneous group of brain disorders that progressively evolve. It has been increasingly appreciated that many neurodegenerative conditions overlap at multiple levels and therefore traditional clinicopathological correlation approaches to better classify a disease have met with limited success. Neuronal network disintegration is fundamental to neurodegeneration, and concepts based around such a concept may better explain the overlap between their clinical and pathological phenotypes. In this Review, promoters of overlap in neurodegeneration incorporating behavioural, cognitive, metabolic, motor, and extrapyramidal presentations will be critically appraised. In addition, evidence that may support the existence of large-scale networks that might be contributing to phenotypic differentiation will be considered across a neurodegenerative spectrum. Disintegration of neuronal networks through different pathological processes, such as prion-like spread, may provide a better paradigm of disease and thereby facilitate the identification of novel therapies for neurodegeneration.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1234-1241
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry
Volume87
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2016
Externally publishedYes

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Bibliographical note

Version archived for private and non-commercial use with the permission of the author/s and according to publisher conditions. For further rights please contact the publisher.

Keywords

  • Alzheimer's disease
  • cognition
  • dementia
  • motor neuron disease
  • neuroanatomy

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