New bradoriids from the lower Cambrian Mernmerna Formation, South Australia: systematics, biostratigraphy and biogeography

Timothy P. Topper, Christian B. Skovsted, Glenn A. Brock, John R. Paterson

    Research output: Contribution to journalConference paperpeer-review

    13 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    An assemblage of bradoriid anthropods from the Mernmerna Formation in the Donkey Bore Syncline, central Flinders Rangers, South Australia contains eleven species, including three species of the enigmatic ornamented spine Mongloitubulus. Four new taxa are described, Onagrocharion tuberosus gen. et sp. nov., Amphikeropsis myklosis gen. et sp. nov., Hipponicharion australis sp. nov. and Mongolitubulus unipinosa sp. nov. The presence of Hipponicharion australis sp. nov. in the upper Mernmerna Formation represents the first occurrence of the genus in Australia and extends the biogeographic range of Hipponicharion to eastern Gondwana. Bradoriid specimens of Mongolitubulus unispinosa sp. nov. exhibiting a single mature ornamented spine attached to the central portion of the carapace provides definitive evidence of a bradoriid affinity or the enigmatic, widespread Mongolitubulus small shelly fossil taxon. The assemblage includes several species that facilitate correlation with the Stansbury basin of South Australia, but also with faunas from other Cambrian palaeocontinents, including Antarctica and Laurentia.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)67-100
    Number of pages34
    JournalSouth Australia 2006 : papers from the XI international conference of the Cambrian Stage Subdivision Working Group
    Publication statusPublished - 2007
    EventInternational Conference of the Cambrian Stage Subdivision Working Group (11th : 2006) - Adelaide
    Duration: 14 Aug 200624 Aug 2006

    Keywords

    • Early Cambrian
    • South Australia
    • Bradoriida
    • new taxa
    • Onagrocharion
    • Amphukeropsis

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'New bradoriids from the lower Cambrian Mernmerna Formation, South Australia: systematics, biostratigraphy and biogeography'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this