Non-criminal psychopathy and the electrodermal response

gender differences in self-report and psychophysiological arousal

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

The use of different psychophysiological and construct measures to investigate emotional deficits associated with psychopathy have compromised comparisons across studies with criminal and non-criminal samples. The aim of this two-part study was to determine if non-criminal psychopathy was associated with reduced electrodermal arousal using measures comparable to those employed with criminal samples. Part 1 involved recruiting a non-criminal sample with a range of psychopathic traits. Part 2 was the test phase and involved recording participants’ skin conductance response (SCR) to affective pictures. Similar to findings with criminal psychopaths, higher scores on the Criminal Tendencies facet of psychopathy were associated with a smaller SCR when viewing pleasant pictures. Gender differences found in the relationship between psychopathy, SCR and affective picture ratings provide possible insights into gender differences in the manifestation of psychopathy.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationPsychology of individual differences
Subtitle of host publicationnew research
EditorsEleanor Roberson
Place of PublicationNew York
PublisherNova Science Publishers
Pages93-110
Number of pages18
ISBN (Electronic)9781634845397
ISBN (Print)9781634845083
Publication statusPublished - 2016

Publication series

NamePerspectives on cognitive psychology

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  • Cite this

    Mahmut, M., Stevenson, R. J., & Homewood, J. (2016). Non-criminal psychopathy and the electrodermal response: gender differences in self-report and psychophysiological arousal. In E. Roberson (Ed.), Psychology of individual differences: new research (pp. 93-110). (Perspectives on cognitive psychology). New York: Nova Science Publishers.