Non-Invasive measurement of blood pressure - Why we should look at BP traces rather than listen to Korotkoff sounds

Branko G. Celler*, Jim Basilakis, Kathryn Goozee, Eliathamby Ambikairajah

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contributionpeer-review

    12 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Accurate non-invasive measurement of blood pressure in unsupervised environments continues to be a challenge, particularly in the presence of movement artefact, electrical noise and most importantly cardiac arrhythmia which are common in those aged over 65 suffering from a range of chronic conditions. Large intra personal variability in signal morphometry and amplitudes further complicates the development of reliable signal processing algorithms for NIBP measurement. In this paper we demonstrate the effect of this variability and propose that the traditional methods of human blood pressure determination by sphygmomanometry should no longer be considered a gold standard for the calibration of NIBP devices.

    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publication37th Annual International Conference of the IEEE
    Subtitle of host publicationEngineering in Medicine and Biology Society (EMBC 2015)
    Place of PublicationNew York
    PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE)
    Pages5964-5967
    Number of pages4
    ISBN (Electronic)9781424492718
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 4 Nov 2015
    Event37th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBC 2015 - Milan, Italy
    Duration: 25 Aug 201529 Aug 2015

    Other

    Other37th Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBC 2015
    Country/TerritoryItaly
    CityMilan
    Period25/08/1529/08/15

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