Non-orebody sources are significant contributors to blood lead of some children with low to moderate lead exposure in a major lead mining community

Brian L. Gulson*, Karen J. Mizon, Michael J. Korsch, Donald Howarth

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    30 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    High precision lead isotope ratios in blood from 58 children aged 1-11 years from the Broken Hill lead mining community have been measured to determine the source and pathways of lead in their blood. Sources of lead are from the Pb-Zn-Ag orebody (lead), from paint and from petrol. Thirty-five of the 58 children (60%) had blood leads (PbB) ≥0.72 μmol/l (15 μg/dl), the current level of 'personal exposure and source remediation/abatement' compared with a 'background' level of ~0.29 μmol/l (6 μg/dl), estimated from adult females who were generally mothers of the children. Six of 17 children aged 7 years or older, had PbBs ≥ 0.72 μmol/l (15 μg/dl). Even though the orebody lead is the major contributor to PbB in Broken Hill children, of the 35 children whose PbB is ≥0.72 μm/l (15 μg/dl), 12 (34%) have ~50% or more of their PbB derived from sources such as paint and petrol or both by isotopic identification. The identification of elevated PbB in older children is a concern, especially for females, as there is potential for release of endogenous lead during pregnancy and lactation.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)223-230
    Number of pages8
    JournalScience of the Total Environment
    Volume181
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 29 Mar 1996

    Bibliographical note

    Corrigendum can be found in The Science of the Total Environment, 191(3), pages 299-301, 1996, https://doi.org/10.1016/S0048-9697(96)05307-7

    Keywords

    • isotopes
    • lead mine
    • sources
    • young children

    Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Non-orebody sources are significant contributors to blood lead of some children with low to moderate lead exposure in a major lead mining community'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this