Now you see it, now you don't

On turning semantic interference into facilitation in a stroop-like task

Matthew Finkbeiner*, Alfonso Caramazza

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

131 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We use a masked priming procedure to test two accounts of the picture-word interference (PWI) effect: the lexical selection by competition account (Levelt et al., 1999; Roelofs, 1992) and the response selection account (Lupker, 1979; Miozzo and Caramazza, 2003). In the visible (standard) condition, we replicated the often-observed semantic interference effect. In the masked condition, we observed semantic facilitation. We take the polarity shift as a function of masking to mean that the semantic interference and semantic facilitation in the PWI task should be attributed to two qualitatively different processes. We argue that this conclusion follows naturally from the response selection account, but only with great difficulty from the lexical selection by competition account.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)790-796
Number of pages7
JournalCortex
Volume42
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Lexical access
  • Masked priming
  • Picture word interference
  • Response selection

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