Numerical simulation of the spatiotemporal development of linear disturbances in Stokes layers: absolute instability and the effects of high-frequency harmonics

Alexander Ramage, Christopher Davies*, Christian Thomas, Michael Togneri

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)
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Abstract

For a family of oscillatory Stokes layers, the spatiotemporal evolution of impulsively excited disturbances is investigated, using direct numerical simulations of the linearized Navier-Stokes equations. The semi-infinite planar Stokes layer is modified to incorporate a low-amplitude, high-frequency harmonic, which provides a simplified model of the external noise found in physical experiments. For the unmodified Stokes layer, impulsively excited disturbances are known to form family-tree-like structures, composed of multiple
wave packets. The long-term behavior that is encompassed within these structures is studied, together with the effects upon them of the alterations to the base flow. In the absence of any base-flow modification, the disturbances are discovered to exhibit a subharmonic pattern of temporal growth, with a periodicity that is twice that of the basic state. It is also shown that when linear instability first arises, it takes an absolute rather than a convective form. Inclusion of a high-frequency harmonic into the basic state is found to have a strong and destabilizing impact upon the impulse response. The development of
the family-tree-like disturbance structure can be disrupted, changing the character of the absolute instability and promoting its appearance at much reduced Reynolds numbers.
Original languageEnglish
Article number103901
Pages (from-to)1-21
Number of pages21
JournalPhysical Review Fluids
Volume5
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2020

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