Obama, hip hop and a new black masculinity

James Cox

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contribution

Abstract

When asked about the election of Barack Obama to the Presidency of the United States of America, the rapper Common suggested that this act would "change Hip Hop for the better" (McLaughlin 2008). During the campaign, Obama made a conscious effort to engage with the Hip Hop generation and many Hip Hop artists lent their support to Obama. This article discusses Obama's connections to the Hip Hop community with reference to Street's (2004) concept of the 'Celebrity Politician'. Also of interest is the effect Obama had on Hip Hop, particularly mainstream Hip Hop, where politics is not usually associated with any of the artists. Here Hip Hop changed to reflect the emergence of Obama on the global stage. In particular, some performances in mainstream Hip Hop changed to reflect less of a 'thug' image and instead promoted political engagement rather than Hip Hop's stereotypical tropes.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationInstruments of change
Subtitle of host publicationproceedings of the International Association for the Study of Popular Music Australia-New Zealand 2010 Conference
EditorsJennifer Cattermole, Graeme Smith, Shane Homan
Place of PublicationMelbourne
PublisherInternational Association for the Study of Popular Music
Pages31-36
Number of pages6
ISBN (Print)9780975774748
Publication statusPublished - 2011
EventInternational Association for the Study of Popular Music Australia-New Zealand Conference - Melbourne
Duration: 24 Nov 201026 Nov 2010

Conference

ConferenceInternational Association for the Study of Popular Music Australia-New Zealand Conference
CityMelbourne
Period24/11/1026/11/10

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