Occurrence of CYP1B1 mutations in juvenile open-angle glaucoma with advanced visual field loss

Emmanuelle Souzeau*, Melanie Hayes, Tiger Zhou, Owen M. Siggs, Bronwyn Ridge, Mona S. Awadalla, James E H Smith, Jonathan B. Ruddle, James E. Elder, David A. Mackey, Alex W. Hewitt, Paul R. Healey, Ivan Goldberg, William H. Morgan, John Landers, Andrew Dubowsky, Kathryn P. Burdon, Jamie E. Craig

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    10 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    IMPORTANCE: Juvenile open-angle glaucoma (JOAG) is a severe neurodegenerative eye disorder in which most of the genetic contribution remains unexplained. OBJECTIVE: To assess the prevalence of pathogenic CYP1B1 sequence variants in an Australian cohort of patients with JOAG and severe visual field loss. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: For this cohort study, we recruited 160 patients with JOAG classified as advanced (n = 118) and nonadvanced (n = 42) through the Australian and New Zealand Registry of Advanced Glaucoma from January 1, 2007, through April 1, 2014. Eighty individuals with no evidence of glaucoma served as a control group. We defined JOAG as diagnosis before age 40 years and advanced JOAG as visual field loss in 2 of the 4 central fixation squares on a reliable visual field test result. We performed direct sequencing of the entire coding region of CYP1B1. Data analysis was performed in October 2014. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Identification and characterization of CYP1B1 sequence variants. RESULTS: We identified 7 different pathogenic variants among 8 of 118 patients with advanced JOAG (6.8%) but none among the patients with nonadvanced JOAG. Three patients were homozygous or compound heterozygous for CYP1B1 pathogenic variants, which provided a likely basis for their disease. Five patients were heterozygous. The allele frequency among the patients with advanced JOAG (11 in 236 [4.7%]) was higher than among our controls (1 in 160 [0.6%]; P = .02; odds ratio, 7.8 [95% CI, 0.02-1.0]) or among the control population from the Exome Aggregation Consortium database (2946 of 122 960 [2.4%]; P = .02; odds ratio, 2.0 [95% CI, 0.3-0.9]). Individuals with CYP1B1 pathogenic variants, whether heterozygous or homozygous, had worse mean (SD) deviation on visual fields (-24.5 [5.1] [95% CI, -31.8 to -17.2] vs -15.6 [10.0] [95% CI, -17.1 to -13.6] dB; F1,126 = 5.90; P = .02; partial ηp2 = 0.05) and were younger at diagnosis (mean [SD] age, 23.1 [8.4] [95% CI, 17.2-29.1] vs 31.5 [8.0] [95% CI, 30.1-33.0] years; F1,122 = 7.18; P = .008; ηp2 = 0.06) than patients without CYP1B1 pathogenic variants. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Patients with advanced JOAG based on visual field loss had enrichment of CYP1B1 pathogenic variants and a more severe phenotype compared with unaffected controls and patients with nonadvanced JOAG.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)826-833
    Number of pages8
    JournalJAMA Ophthalmology
    Volume133
    Issue number7
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2015

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