Of families, fickleness and forgeries

the problem of proof when forgery is alleged in probate proceedings

Rosalind Croucher, John Croucher

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contribution

Abstract

The evidentiary threshold of proving a will is a necessary consequence of the place of wills as an exercise of testamentary freedom in the common law. This is challenged most when it is suspected, or alleged, that a document being propounded as the last will of the deceased contains forged signatures. This article explores the problems that such an allegation creates and the role of the forensic document examiner in the relevant evidence being assessed by the court in deciding whether or not to grant probate or letters of administration cum testamento annexo of the propounded paper.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAustralian College of Legal Medicine, Annual Scientific Meeting
Place of PublicationAustralia
PublisherANZFSS & ALCM
Pages1-26
Number of pages26
Publication statusPublished - 2008
EventAustralian College of Legal Medicine, Annual Scientifc Meeting -
Duration: 7 Oct 20087 Oct 2008

Conference

ConferenceAustralian College of Legal Medicine, Annual Scientifc Meeting
Period7/10/087/10/08

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Keywords

  • forged wills
  • probate

Cite this

Croucher, R., & Croucher, J. (2008). Of families, fickleness and forgeries: the problem of proof when forgery is alleged in probate proceedings. In Australian College of Legal Medicine, Annual Scientific Meeting (pp. 1-26). Australia: ANZFSS & ALCM.