Older age is associated with greater central aortic blood pressure following the exercise stress test in subjects with similar brachial systolic blood pressure

Masatake Kobayashi*, Kazutaka Oshima, Yoichi Iwasaki, Yuto Kumai, Alberto Avolio, Akira Yamashina, Kenji Takazawa

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Brachial systolic pressure (BSP) is often monitored during exercise by the stress test; however, central systolic pressure (CSP) is thought to be a more direct measure of cardiovascular events. Although some studies reported that exercise and aging may play roles in changes of both BSP and CSP, the relationship between BSP and CSP with age following the exercise stress test remains unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of age on the relationship between BSP and CSP measured after exercise. Ninety-six subjects underwent the diagnostic treadmill exercise stress test, and we retrospectively divided them into the following 3 groups by age: the younger age group (43 ± 4 years), middle age group (58 ± 4 years), and older age group (70 ± 4 years). Subjects exercised according to the Bruce protocol, to achieve 85 % of their age-predicted maximum heart rate or until the appearance of exercise-associated symptoms. BSP, CSP, and pulse rate (PR) were measured using a HEM-9000AI (Omron Healthcare, Japan) at rest and after exercise. BSP, CSP, and PR at rest were not significantly different among the 3 groups (p = 0.92, 0.21, and 0.99, respectively). BSP and PR immediately after exercise were not significantly different among the groups (p = 0.70 and 0.38, respectively). However, CSP immediately after exercise was 144 ± 18 mmHg (younger age), 149 ± 17 mmHg (middle age), and 158 ± 19 mmHg (older age). CSP in the older age group was significantly higher than that in the younger age group (p < 0.01). Despite similar BSPs in all age groups after exercise, CSP was higher in the older age group. Therefore, older subjects have a higher CSP after exercise, which is not readily assessed by conventional measurements of BSP.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1354-1360
Number of pages7
JournalHeart and Vessels
Volume31
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2016

Keywords

  • central blood pressure
  • aging
  • exercise
  • systolic pressure amplification

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Older age is associated with greater central aortic blood pressure following the exercise stress test in subjects with similar brachial systolic blood pressure'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this