On the rates of convergence of the wireless multi-access interference distribution to the normal distribution

Hazer Inaltekin*, Stephen V. Hanly

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contributionpeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

It is of prime importance to reveal the structure of wireless multi-access interference distributions to compute many performance bounds and metrics for wireless networks such as transmission capacity, outage probability and bit-errorrate. However, at the present, there are no closed form expressions for the multi-access interference distributions in wireless networks apart from a very special case. This paper presents a principled methodology towards the resolution of this bottleneck by establishing rates of convergence of the multi-access interference distribution to a Gaussian distribution for any given bounded power-law decaying path-loss function •. In particular, it is shown that the interference distribution converges to the Gaussian distribution with the same mean and variance at a rate √1/•, where •• 0 is the intensity of the homogenous planar Poisson point process generating node locations.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationWiOpt 2010 - 8th Intl. Symposium on Modeling and Optimization in Mobile, Ad Hoc, and Wireless Networks
Place of PublicationPiscataway, NJ
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE)
Pages453-458
Number of pages6
ISBN (Print)9781424475254
Publication statusPublished - 2010
Externally publishedYes
Event8th International Symposium on Modeling and Optimization in Mobile, Ad Hoc, and Wireless Networks, WiOpt 2010 - Avignon, France
Duration: 31 May 20104 Jun 2010

Other

Other8th International Symposium on Modeling and Optimization in Mobile, Ad Hoc, and Wireless Networks, WiOpt 2010
CountryFrance
CityAvignon
Period31/05/104/06/10

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