On the use of multiple antennas to reduce MAC layer coordination in Ad hoc networks

Raymond H Y Louie, Matthew R. McKay, Iain B. Collings

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contribution

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper investigates an important tradeoff in wireless ad hoc networks concerning the allocation of resources to the PHY and MAC layers. We compare two approaches: One which employs a non-coordinated slotted ALOHA MAC with multi-antenna PHY, and one which employs a tightly coordinated MAC and single-antenna PHY. For both cases, we derive new closed-form throughput expressions. Based on these, we show that using simple slotted ALOHA in conjunction with multiple antennas can provide a higher throughput than fully coordinated access protocols in various practical scenarios. Our results are confirmed through comparison with Monte Carlo simulations.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationICC 2008 - IEEE International Conference on Communications, Proceedings
Place of PublicationPiscataway, NJ
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE)
Pages4554-4558
Number of pages5
ISBN (Print)9781424420742
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008
Externally publishedYes
EventIEEE International Conference on Communications, ICC 2008 - Beijing, China
Duration: 19 May 200823 May 2008

Other

OtherIEEE International Conference on Communications, ICC 2008
CountryChina
CityBeijing
Period19/05/0823/05/08

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  • Cite this

    Louie, R. H. Y., McKay, M. R., & Collings, I. B. (2008). On the use of multiple antennas to reduce MAC layer coordination in Ad hoc networks. In ICC 2008 - IEEE International Conference on Communications, Proceedings (pp. 4554-4558). [4533890] Piscataway, NJ: Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). https://doi.org/10.1109/ICC.2008.854