Opioid substitution therapy is associated with increased detection of hepatitis C virus infection

a 15-year observational cohort study

Sarah Larney*, Jason Grebely, Michael Falster, Alexander Swart, Janaki Amin, Louisa Degenhardt, Lucinda Burns, Claire M. Vajdic

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Strategies are needed to enhance screening of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection among people who inject drugs to improve engagement in HCV treatment, and stem the growing burden of HCV-related morbidity and mortality. Methods: We linked routinely collected data on enrolment in opioid substitution therapy (OST) and HCV notifications. We calculated rates of incident HCV notifications, and compared rates in and out of OST. Results: Following adjustment for sex, age and calendar period, rates of incident HCV notification were significantly higher during periods of OST, compared to periods out of OST (adjusted incident rate ratio: 1.91; 95% confidence interval: 1.86, 1.97). This effect was seen across multiple treatment periods. Conclusions: HCV screening in OST settings increases detection of HCV infection among people who inject drugs.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)213-216
Number of pages4
JournalDrug and Alcohol Dependence
Volume148
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2015
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Hepatitis C virus
  • Notification
  • Opioid substitution therapy
  • People who inject drugs
  • Screening

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