Oral vitamin C improves carotid baroreflex sensitivity in chronic heart failure

D. J. Blackman, J. A. Morris-Thurgood, G. R. Ellis, J. R. Cockcroft, M. P. Frenneaux

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) is reduced in chronic heart failure (CHF) and is associated with an adverse prognosis. Oxidative stress may be implicated via reduced arterial compliance and/or direct effects on bare-receptor nerve endings. We investigated the effects on baroreflex sensitivity of treatment with the antioxidant vitamin C in CHF. 10 patients with CHF were studied. Integrated BRS was measured using spontaneous sequence analysis of a 10 minute recording of blood pressure and ECG, and arterial BRS evaluated using a carotid neck collar. BRS was recorded at baseline, 1 month after treatment with oral vitamin C 2g bd, and in a subset of 5 patients repeated 6 weeks after stopping treatment. Baseline BRS was measured in 10 age-matched controls for comparison. Both spontaneous and carotid BRS were significantly reduced in the patients compared to the controls (7.3±3.0 vs 13.3±5.2 ms/mmHg, p=0.005, and 0.9±0.6 vs 2.9±2.1 ms/mmHg, p=0.01 respectively). After treatment with vitamin C there was a significant improvement in carotid BRS (0.9±0.6 to 1.7±1.1, p=0.04) but no change in spontaneous BRS (7.3±3.0 to 7.8±3.3, p=0.54). In the subgroup re-evaluated after discontinuing treatment, carotid BRS deteriorated (1.7±0.8 to 1.1±0.7, p=0.02), but spontaneous BRS remained unchanged (8.5±4.9 to 10.1±8.8. p=0.68). Treatment with the antioxidant vitamin C results in an improvement in carotid arterial baroreflex sensitivity in patients with CHF which is reversed 6 weeks after stopping therapy. There is no effect on integrated BRS assessed by spontaneous sequence analysis.

LanguageEnglish
JournalHeart
Volume81
Issue numberSUPPL. 1
Publication statusPublished - May 1999
Externally publishedYes

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Baroreflex
Ascorbic Acid
Heart Failure
Therapeutics
Sequence Analysis
Antioxidants
Nerve Endings
Compliance
Arterial Pressure
Electrocardiography
Oxidative Stress
Neck

Cite this

Blackman, D. J., Morris-Thurgood, J. A., Ellis, G. R., Cockcroft, J. R., & Frenneaux, M. P. (1999). Oral vitamin C improves carotid baroreflex sensitivity in chronic heart failure. Heart, 81(SUPPL. 1).
Blackman, D. J. ; Morris-Thurgood, J. A. ; Ellis, G. R. ; Cockcroft, J. R. ; Frenneaux, M. P. / Oral vitamin C improves carotid baroreflex sensitivity in chronic heart failure. In: Heart. 1999 ; Vol. 81, No. SUPPL. 1.
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abstract = "Baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) is reduced in chronic heart failure (CHF) and is associated with an adverse prognosis. Oxidative stress may be implicated via reduced arterial compliance and/or direct effects on bare-receptor nerve endings. We investigated the effects on baroreflex sensitivity of treatment with the antioxidant vitamin C in CHF. 10 patients with CHF were studied. Integrated BRS was measured using spontaneous sequence analysis of a 10 minute recording of blood pressure and ECG, and arterial BRS evaluated using a carotid neck collar. BRS was recorded at baseline, 1 month after treatment with oral vitamin C 2g bd, and in a subset of 5 patients repeated 6 weeks after stopping treatment. Baseline BRS was measured in 10 age-matched controls for comparison. Both spontaneous and carotid BRS were significantly reduced in the patients compared to the controls (7.3±3.0 vs 13.3±5.2 ms/mmHg, p=0.005, and 0.9±0.6 vs 2.9±2.1 ms/mmHg, p=0.01 respectively). After treatment with vitamin C there was a significant improvement in carotid BRS (0.9±0.6 to 1.7±1.1, p=0.04) but no change in spontaneous BRS (7.3±3.0 to 7.8±3.3, p=0.54). In the subgroup re-evaluated after discontinuing treatment, carotid BRS deteriorated (1.7±0.8 to 1.1±0.7, p=0.02), but spontaneous BRS remained unchanged (8.5±4.9 to 10.1±8.8. p=0.68). Treatment with the antioxidant vitamin C results in an improvement in carotid arterial baroreflex sensitivity in patients with CHF which is reversed 6 weeks after stopping therapy. There is no effect on integrated BRS assessed by spontaneous sequence analysis.",
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Blackman, DJ, Morris-Thurgood, JA, Ellis, GR, Cockcroft, JR & Frenneaux, MP 1999, 'Oral vitamin C improves carotid baroreflex sensitivity in chronic heart failure', Heart, vol. 81, no. SUPPL. 1.

Oral vitamin C improves carotid baroreflex sensitivity in chronic heart failure. / Blackman, D. J.; Morris-Thurgood, J. A.; Ellis, G. R.; Cockcroft, J. R.; Frenneaux, M. P.

In: Heart, Vol. 81, No. SUPPL. 1, 05.1999.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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AU - Ellis, G. R.

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AU - Frenneaux, M. P.

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Blackman DJ, Morris-Thurgood JA, Ellis GR, Cockcroft JR, Frenneaux MP. Oral vitamin C improves carotid baroreflex sensitivity in chronic heart failure. Heart. 1999 May;81(SUPPL. 1).