Organ donation after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: a scientific statement from the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation

Laurie J. Morrison, Claudio Sandroni, Brian Grunau, Michael Parr, Finlay MacNeil, Gavin D. Perkins, Mayuki Aibiki, Eileen Censullo, Steve Lin, Robert W. Neumar, Steven C. Brooks, International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

AIM OF THE REVIEW: Improving rates of organ donation among patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest who do not survive is an opportunity to save countless lives. The objectives of this scientific statement were to do the following: define the opportunity for organ donation among patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest; identify challenges and opportunities associated with organ donation by patients with cardiac arrest; identify strategies, including a generic protocol for organ donation after cardiac arrest, to increase the rate and consistency of organ donation from this population; and provide rationale for including organ donation as a key clinical outcome for all future cardiac arrest clinical trials and registries. METHODS: The scope of this International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation scientific statement was approved by the International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation board and the American Heart Association, posted on ILCOR.org for public comment, and then assigned by section to primary and secondary authors. A unique literature search was completed and updated for each section. RESULTS: There are a number of defining pathways for patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest to become organ donors; however, modifications in the Maastricht classification system need to be made to correctly identify these donors and to report outcomes with consistency. Suggested modifications to the minimum data set for reporting cardiac arrests will increase reporting of organ donation as an important resuscitation outcome. There are a number of challenges with implementing uncontrolled donation after cardiac death protocols, and the greatest impediment is the lack of legislation in most countries to mandate organ donation as the default option. Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation has the potential to increase organ donation rates, but more research is needed to derive neuroprognostication rules to guide clinical decision-making about when to stop extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation and to evaluate cost-effectiveness. CONCLUSIONS: All health systems should develop, implement, and evaluate protocols designed to optimize organ donation opportunities for patients who have an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest and failed attempts at resuscitation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)e120-e146
Number of pages27
JournalCirculation
Volume148
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 5 Sept 2023

Bibliographical note

Corrections exist for this article. The original has been updated. The correction document may be found at doi: 10.1161/CIR.0000000000001252

Keywords

  • AHA Scientific Statements
  • heart arrest
  • resuscitation
  • tissue and organ procurement

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