Origin and geochemical evolution of saline groundwater in the Brisbane coastal plain, Australia

Aro V. Arakel*, W. F. Ridley

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    6 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Fresh, brackish and saline groundwaters of variable acidity and redox potentials occur in a coastal floodplain area, north of the Brisbane River in Southeast Queensland, Australia. The complicated spatial and vertical distribution of these groundwaters, and their tendency towards a seawater chemistry, reflect that the local groundwater system has undergone repeated episodes of hydrological adjustments in response to Quaternary sea-level fluctuations and coastal landscape modifications. Since the last major Holocene transgression, topographic changes have permitted repetition of evaporative concentration, aeration and acidification processes in near-surface groundwaters. The surface and subsurface occurrences of gypsum, pyrite and jarosite minerals, in the Brisbane coastal plain, testify to the intrinsic relationship between sea-level and topographic variations, and hydrogeochemistry of the local groundwater system.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)257-275
    Number of pages19
    JournalCatena
    Volume13
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1986

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