Origins and evolution of religion from a Darwinian point of view: synthesis of different theories

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterResearchpeer-review

Abstract

The religious phenomenon is a complex one in many respects. In recent years an increasing number of theories on the origin and evolution of religion have been put forward. Each one of these theories rests on a Darwinian framework but there is a lot of disagreement about which bits of the framework account best for the evolution of religion. Is religion primarily a by-product of some adaptation? Is it itself an adaptation, and if it is, does it beneficiate individuals or groups? In this chapter, I review a number of theories that link religion to cooperation and show that these theories, contrary to what is often suggested in the literature, are not mutually exclusive. As I present each theory, I delineate an integrative framework that allows distinguishing the explanandum of each theory. Once this is done, it becomes clear that some theories provide good explanations for the origin of religion but not so good explanations for its maintenance and vice versa. Similarly some explanations are good explanations for the evolution of religious individual level traits but not so good explanations for traits hard to define at the individual level. I suggest that to fully understand the religious phenomenon, integrating in a systematic way the different theories and the data is a more successful approach.

LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationHandbook of evolutionary thinking in the sciences
EditorsThomas Heams, Philippe Huneman, Guillaume Lecointre, Marc Silberstein
Place of PublicationDordrecht, Netherlands
PublisherSpringer, Springer Nature
Pages761-780
Number of pages20
ISBN (Electronic)9789401790147
ISBN (Print)9789401790130
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2015
Externally publishedYes

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religion
Religion
synthesis
Maintenance
Evolution of Religion

Cite this

Bourrat, P. (2015). Origins and evolution of religion from a Darwinian point of view: synthesis of different theories. In T. Heams, P. Huneman, G. Lecointre, & M. Silberstein (Eds.), Handbook of evolutionary thinking in the sciences (pp. 761-780). Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer, Springer Nature. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-017-9014-7_36
Bourrat, Pierrick. / Origins and evolution of religion from a Darwinian point of view : synthesis of different theories. Handbook of evolutionary thinking in the sciences. editor / Thomas Heams ; Philippe Huneman ; Guillaume Lecointre ; Marc Silberstein. Dordrecht, Netherlands : Springer, Springer Nature, 2015. pp. 761-780
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Bourrat, P 2015, Origins and evolution of religion from a Darwinian point of view: synthesis of different theories. in T Heams, P Huneman, G Lecointre & M Silberstein (eds), Handbook of evolutionary thinking in the sciences. Springer, Springer Nature, Dordrecht, Netherlands, pp. 761-780. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-017-9014-7_36

Origins and evolution of religion from a Darwinian point of view : synthesis of different theories. / Bourrat, Pierrick.

Handbook of evolutionary thinking in the sciences. ed. / Thomas Heams; Philippe Huneman; Guillaume Lecointre; Marc Silberstein. Dordrecht, Netherlands : Springer, Springer Nature, 2015. p. 761-780.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterResearchpeer-review

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Bourrat P. Origins and evolution of religion from a Darwinian point of view: synthesis of different theories. In Heams T, Huneman P, Lecointre G, Silberstein M, editors, Handbook of evolutionary thinking in the sciences. Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer, Springer Nature. 2015. p. 761-780 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-94-017-9014-7_36