Otter or mongoose? Chewing over the evidence in wall scenes

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

The representation of two ambiguous figures in the Old Kingdom Saqqara tombs of Mereuka and Hesi have been identified equally as Egyptian mongooses and otters. However, while mongooses are known to have inhabited ancient Egypt, otters are not indigenous to the country. The case for otters in Egypt during the pharaoic period is re-evaluated by considering both artistic and behavioural data.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationEgyptian culture and society
Subtitle of host publicationstudies in honour of Naguib Kanawati
EditorsAlexandra Woods, Ann McFarlane, Susanne Binder
Place of PublicationCairo, Egypt
PublisherSupreme Council of Antiquities Egypt
Pages119-129
Number of pages11
Volume1
ISBN (Print)9789774798450
Publication statusPublished - 2010

Publication series

NameSupplément aux Annales du Service des antiquités de l'Egypte
PublisherSupreme Council of Antiquities Egypt
Number38

Keywords

  • animals
  • ancient Egypt
  • art
  • animal behaviour

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  • Cite this

    Evans, L. (2010). Otter or mongoose? Chewing over the evidence in wall scenes. In A. Woods, A. McFarlane, & S. Binder (Eds.), Egyptian culture and society: studies in honour of Naguib Kanawati (Vol. 1, pp. 119-129). (Supplément aux Annales du Service des antiquités de l'Egypte; No. 38). Cairo, Egypt: Supreme Council of Antiquities Egypt.