Outcomes of early use of an end of range axilla orthotic in children following burn injury

Rhianydd Thomas, Stephanie Wicks, Claire Toose, Verity Pacey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Scar contracture is a significant complication of burn injury. This study aimed to describe outcomes of early axilla orthotic use at end of range abduction in children, following a burn to the axilla region. A retrospective review of 76 children (mean age 3.9 years [SD 3.6]) treated at a tertiary children's hospital from 2006 to 2016 was conducted. No child developed axilla contracture for the duration of the 2-year study follow-up with no adverse events recorded. If orthotic use was ceased <60 days post-burn, it was considered not an essential intervention to maintain range of movement, leaving 49 children using the orthotic ≥60 days. Compared with the children who ceased orthotic use in <60 days, children who required the orthotic ≥60 days had a significantly higher frequency of deep-dermal burn (59 vs 25%, p = .01), flame mechanism (25 vs 5%, p = .03), and burn injury distribution involving the anterior trunk, flank, and arm (18 vs 3%, p = .03). Early signs of contracture, considered loss of full axilla range or significant banding, developed in nine children within 3 months post-burn. With intensive therapy, all returned to full axilla range by 9 months post-burn. Children with skin tension at end of range shoulder movement at the 1-month clinical assessment were 11 times more likely to develop early signs of contracture (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.9-62.1, p = .007). Intensive orthotic use at end of range shoulder abduction in children with axilla burns is well tolerated. When undertaken with ongoing therapist review, full axilla range can be maintained.

LanguageEnglish
Pages678-688
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of burn care & research : official publication of the American Burn Association
Volume40
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 14 Aug 2019

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Axilla
Wounds and Injuries
Contracture
Burns
Skin
Tertiary Care Centers
Cicatrix
Arm
Confidence Intervals

Cite this

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title = "Outcomes of early use of an end of range axilla orthotic in children following burn injury",
abstract = "Scar contracture is a significant complication of burn injury. This study aimed to describe outcomes of early axilla orthotic use at end of range abduction in children, following a burn to the axilla region. A retrospective review of 76 children (mean age 3.9 years [SD 3.6]) treated at a tertiary children's hospital from 2006 to 2016 was conducted. No child developed axilla contracture for the duration of the 2-year study follow-up with no adverse events recorded. If orthotic use was ceased <60 days post-burn, it was considered not an essential intervention to maintain range of movement, leaving 49 children using the orthotic ≥60 days. Compared with the children who ceased orthotic use in <60 days, children who required the orthotic ≥60 days had a significantly higher frequency of deep-dermal burn (59 vs 25{\%}, p = .01), flame mechanism (25 vs 5{\%}, p = .03), and burn injury distribution involving the anterior trunk, flank, and arm (18 vs 3{\%}, p = .03). Early signs of contracture, considered loss of full axilla range or significant banding, developed in nine children within 3 months post-burn. With intensive therapy, all returned to full axilla range by 9 months post-burn. Children with skin tension at end of range shoulder movement at the 1-month clinical assessment were 11 times more likely to develop early signs of contracture (95{\%} confidence interval [CI]: 1.9-62.1, p = .007). Intensive orthotic use at end of range shoulder abduction in children with axilla burns is well tolerated. When undertaken with ongoing therapist review, full axilla range can be maintained.",
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Outcomes of early use of an end of range axilla orthotic in children following burn injury. / Thomas, Rhianydd; Wicks, Stephanie; Toose, Claire; Pacey, Verity.

In: Journal of burn care & research : official publication of the American Burn Association, Vol. 40, No. 5, 14.08.2019, p. 678-688.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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N2 - Scar contracture is a significant complication of burn injury. This study aimed to describe outcomes of early axilla orthotic use at end of range abduction in children, following a burn to the axilla region. A retrospective review of 76 children (mean age 3.9 years [SD 3.6]) treated at a tertiary children's hospital from 2006 to 2016 was conducted. No child developed axilla contracture for the duration of the 2-year study follow-up with no adverse events recorded. If orthotic use was ceased <60 days post-burn, it was considered not an essential intervention to maintain range of movement, leaving 49 children using the orthotic ≥60 days. Compared with the children who ceased orthotic use in <60 days, children who required the orthotic ≥60 days had a significantly higher frequency of deep-dermal burn (59 vs 25%, p = .01), flame mechanism (25 vs 5%, p = .03), and burn injury distribution involving the anterior trunk, flank, and arm (18 vs 3%, p = .03). Early signs of contracture, considered loss of full axilla range or significant banding, developed in nine children within 3 months post-burn. With intensive therapy, all returned to full axilla range by 9 months post-burn. Children with skin tension at end of range shoulder movement at the 1-month clinical assessment were 11 times more likely to develop early signs of contracture (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.9-62.1, p = .007). Intensive orthotic use at end of range shoulder abduction in children with axilla burns is well tolerated. When undertaken with ongoing therapist review, full axilla range can be maintained.

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