Paint as a source of recontamination of houses in urban environments and its role in maintaining elevated blood leads in children

Brian L. Gulson*, Jeffrey J. Davis, Jason Bawden-Smith

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

62 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A detailed lead isotopic and scanning electron microscope investigation of particulates from three houses in urban Sydney, previously decontaminated by their owners, has shown that they have been recontaminated over varying periods, as short as 6 months. The source of recontamination is lead paint from adjoining dwellings whose paint thoroughly deteriorated, as well as from unknown sources. In one house, the external to internal lead loading w > 10:1. The pathway for the lead paint contaminants is both airborne and mechanical transport into the house Recontamination of houses provides an explanation for the maintenance of elevated blood lead levels in the children residing in these houses. Recontamination can be a major urban problem applicable in any community which use leaded paints on dwellings in the past. It is a matter of concern for families with young children and couple especially women who are, or intend to become, pregnant.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)221-235
Number of pages15
JournalScience of the Total Environment
Volume164
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 30 Mar 1995
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Children
  • Lead poisoning
  • Paint
  • Recontamination
  • Sources

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