Paranoid males have reduced lateralisation for processing of negative emotions

An investigation using the chimeric faces test

Victoria J. Bourne, Ryan T. McKay

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    1 Citation (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Reduced strength of lateralisation in patients with schizophrenia has been reported in a number of studies. However the exact nature of this relationship remains unclear. In this study, lateralisation for processing emotional faces was measured using the chimeric faces test and examined in relation to paranoia in a non-clinical sample. For males only, those with higher scores on a paranoia questionnaire had reduced lateralisation for processing negative facial emotion. For females there were no significant relationships. These findings suggest that atypical patterns of lateralisation for processing emotional stimuli may be implicated in, or associated with, increased levels of paranoia.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)235-252
    Number of pages18
    JournalLaterality
    Volume19
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 4 Mar 2014

    Keywords

    • Chimeric faces test
    • Emotion lateralisation
    • Paranoia
    • Self-esteem
    • Sex differences

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