Parent and worker expectations and experiences of early childhood services for parents with children with a disability

G. M. Llewellyn, D. McConnell, R. Dunn

Research output: Contribution to journalConference paperpeer-review

Abstract

Aim: To understand the expectations and experiences of parents with children with a disability attending early childhood services: (a) how parents explored daycare and pre-school options, (b) how they negotiated the conditions of enrolment, and (c) how they maintained involvement and the ongoing relationship between the parents and early childhood service. Method: A case study approach: 40 parents and the early childhood worker most involved in the care of their child participated in narrative based, semi-structured interviews. Results: The parent case studies represented a wide range of experiences with preschool and long daycare services. The pre-school/ child-care experience was regarded as most positive and beneficial to all when the parent and worker shared in common: (a) their expectations, (b) an understanding of the child’s disability, (c) an openness in discussing their experiences, and (d) their definition of success. Conclusions: This presentation will focus on what constitutes a ‘good fit’ between parents and preschool and daycare services.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)372
Number of pages1
JournalJournal of Intellectual Disability Research
Volume48
Issue number4-5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2004
Externally publishedYes

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