Parentally biased favouritism in relation to offspring sex in zebra finches

Mark C. Mainwaring, David Lucy, Ian R. Hartley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Family conflicts over parental care result in offspring attempting to exert control using solicitation behaviours, whilst the parents are potentially able to retaliate through provisioning rules. However, the evolutionary interests of one parent may not necessarily support the evolutionary interests of the other parent, and such conflicts of interest may be expressed in how the two parents allocate the same form of parental care to individual offspring. Theory suggests that such parentally biased favouritism is a universally predicted outcome of evolutionary conflicts of interest, and empirical evidence suggests that parentally biased favouritism occurs in relation to offspring size and solicitation behaviours. However, unequivocal empirical evidence of parentally biased favouritism in relation to offspring sex is absent, due to being strongly confounded by sex differences in size and solicitation behaviours. Here, we present strong evidence for parentally biased favouritism in relation to offspring sex in zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata), independent of the effects of chick size and begging intensity. Mothers preferentially provisioned sons over daughters, whilst fathers showed no bias, meaning that sons received more food than daughters. Parentally biased favouritism in relation to offspring sex facilitates parental control over evolutionary conflicts of interest and is probably more widespread than previously realised.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2261-2268
Number of pages8
JournalBehavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
Volume65
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2011

Keywords

  • Chick begging
  • Hatching asynchrony
  • Offspring sex
  • Parental care
  • Parentally biased favouritism
  • Zebra finch

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