Klager til Norsk Pasientskadeerstatning etter nevrokirurgisk behandling

Translated title of the contribution: Patient compensation claims to the Norwegian Patient Compensation System after neurosurgical treatment

Hanne Wikstrøm, Tonje Elisabeth Hansen, Tor Ingebrigtsen*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. We have studied compensation claims to the Norwegian Patient Compensation System raised after treatment in the Department of Neurosurgery of the University Hospital of North Norway in order to identify potentials for improvement. Methods. We present a retrospective study of all claims raised during the years 1994 through 2000. We registered the grounds for claims, outcomes and processing times and analysed them in relation to the annual caseload in the department. Results. A total of 3,873 neurosurgical operations were performed; 52 patients (1.3%) claimed compensation. Claims were raised by a significantly (p < 0.001) higher proportion of patients undergoing spine surgery (2.3%) than by those undergoing intracranial surgery (0.5%). Median case processing time was 396 days. The claims were accepted in 19 cases (37%) and rejected in 28 (53%) cases. Five (10%) cases were not finally settled. Postoperative infection (n = 9) was the most common reason for acceptance. Interpretation. Case processing time is too long. The survey showed no systematic errors. The high frequency of claims after spine surgery suggests that special care should be taken in patient selection and information before such procedures.

Translated title of the contributionPatient compensation claims to the Norwegian Patient Compensation System after neurosurgical treatment
Original languageNorwegian
Pages (from-to)444-446
Number of pages3
JournalTidsskrift for den Norske laegeforening
Volume123
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 20 Feb 2003
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Patient compensation claims to the Norwegian Patient Compensation System after neurosurgical treatment'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this