Patterns of Cryptosporidium oocyst shedding by eastern grey kangaroos inhabiting an Australian watershed

Michelle L. Power, Nicholas C. Sangster, Martin B. Slade, Duncan A. Veal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

The occurrence of Cryptosporidium oocysts in feces from a population of wild eastern grey kangaroos inhabiting a protected watershed in Sydney, Australia, was investigated. Over a 2-year period, Cryptosporidium oocysts were detected in 239 of the 3,557 (6.7%) eastern grey kangaroo fecal samples tested by using a combined immunomagnetic separation and flow cytometric technique. The prevalence of Cryptosporidium in this host population was estimated to range from 0.32% to 28.5%, with peaks occurring during the autumn months. Oocyst shedding intensity ranged from below 20 oocysts/g feces to 2.0 × 10 6 oocysts/g feces, and shedding did not appear to be associated with diarrhea. Although morphologically similar to the human-infective Cryptosporidium hominis and the Cryptosporidium parvum "bovine" genotype oocysts, the oocysts isolated from kangaroo feces were identified as the Cryptosporidium "marsupial" genotype I or "marsupial" genotype II. Kangaroos are the predominant large mammal inhabiting Australian watersheds and are potentially a significant source of Cryptosporidium contamination of drinking water reservoirs. However, this host population was predominantly shedding the marsupial-derived genotypes, which to date have been identified only in marsupial host species.

LanguageEnglish
Pages6159-6164
Number of pages6
JournalApplied and Environmental Microbiology
Volume71
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2005

Fingerprint

Macropus giganteus
Macropodidae
Cryptosporidium
Oocysts
marsupial
oocysts
feces
genotype
Marsupialia
watershed
Metatheria
Feces
Genotype
Cryptosporidium hominis
Immunomagnetic Separation
mammal
Population
Cryptosporidium parvum
autumn
drinking water

Cite this

Power, Michelle L. ; Sangster, Nicholas C. ; Slade, Martin B. ; Veal, Duncan A. / Patterns of Cryptosporidium oocyst shedding by eastern grey kangaroos inhabiting an Australian watershed. In: Applied and Environmental Microbiology. 2005 ; Vol. 71, No. 10. pp. 6159-6164.
@article{7de6af2978d14b19b837109f2ede93c3,
title = "Patterns of Cryptosporidium oocyst shedding by eastern grey kangaroos inhabiting an Australian watershed",
abstract = "The occurrence of Cryptosporidium oocysts in feces from a population of wild eastern grey kangaroos inhabiting a protected watershed in Sydney, Australia, was investigated. Over a 2-year period, Cryptosporidium oocysts were detected in 239 of the 3,557 (6.7{\%}) eastern grey kangaroo fecal samples tested by using a combined immunomagnetic separation and flow cytometric technique. The prevalence of Cryptosporidium in this host population was estimated to range from 0.32{\%} to 28.5{\%}, with peaks occurring during the autumn months. Oocyst shedding intensity ranged from below 20 oocysts/g feces to 2.0 × 10 6 oocysts/g feces, and shedding did not appear to be associated with diarrhea. Although morphologically similar to the human-infective Cryptosporidium hominis and the Cryptosporidium parvum {"}bovine{"} genotype oocysts, the oocysts isolated from kangaroo feces were identified as the Cryptosporidium {"}marsupial{"} genotype I or {"}marsupial{"} genotype II. Kangaroos are the predominant large mammal inhabiting Australian watersheds and are potentially a significant source of Cryptosporidium contamination of drinking water reservoirs. However, this host population was predominantly shedding the marsupial-derived genotypes, which to date have been identified only in marsupial host species.",
author = "Power, {Michelle L.} and Sangster, {Nicholas C.} and Slade, {Martin B.} and Veal, {Duncan A.}",
year = "2005",
month = "10",
doi = "10.1128/AEM.71.10.6159-6164.2005",
language = "English",
volume = "71",
pages = "6159--6164",
journal = "Applied and Environmental Microbiology",
issn = "0099-2240",
publisher = "American Society for Microbiology",
number = "10",

}

Patterns of Cryptosporidium oocyst shedding by eastern grey kangaroos inhabiting an Australian watershed. / Power, Michelle L.; Sangster, Nicholas C.; Slade, Martin B.; Veal, Duncan A.

In: Applied and Environmental Microbiology, Vol. 71, No. 10, 10.2005, p. 6159-6164.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Patterns of Cryptosporidium oocyst shedding by eastern grey kangaroos inhabiting an Australian watershed

AU - Power, Michelle L.

AU - Sangster, Nicholas C.

AU - Slade, Martin B.

AU - Veal, Duncan A.

PY - 2005/10

Y1 - 2005/10

N2 - The occurrence of Cryptosporidium oocysts in feces from a population of wild eastern grey kangaroos inhabiting a protected watershed in Sydney, Australia, was investigated. Over a 2-year period, Cryptosporidium oocysts were detected in 239 of the 3,557 (6.7%) eastern grey kangaroo fecal samples tested by using a combined immunomagnetic separation and flow cytometric technique. The prevalence of Cryptosporidium in this host population was estimated to range from 0.32% to 28.5%, with peaks occurring during the autumn months. Oocyst shedding intensity ranged from below 20 oocysts/g feces to 2.0 × 10 6 oocysts/g feces, and shedding did not appear to be associated with diarrhea. Although morphologically similar to the human-infective Cryptosporidium hominis and the Cryptosporidium parvum "bovine" genotype oocysts, the oocysts isolated from kangaroo feces were identified as the Cryptosporidium "marsupial" genotype I or "marsupial" genotype II. Kangaroos are the predominant large mammal inhabiting Australian watersheds and are potentially a significant source of Cryptosporidium contamination of drinking water reservoirs. However, this host population was predominantly shedding the marsupial-derived genotypes, which to date have been identified only in marsupial host species.

AB - The occurrence of Cryptosporidium oocysts in feces from a population of wild eastern grey kangaroos inhabiting a protected watershed in Sydney, Australia, was investigated. Over a 2-year period, Cryptosporidium oocysts were detected in 239 of the 3,557 (6.7%) eastern grey kangaroo fecal samples tested by using a combined immunomagnetic separation and flow cytometric technique. The prevalence of Cryptosporidium in this host population was estimated to range from 0.32% to 28.5%, with peaks occurring during the autumn months. Oocyst shedding intensity ranged from below 20 oocysts/g feces to 2.0 × 10 6 oocysts/g feces, and shedding did not appear to be associated with diarrhea. Although morphologically similar to the human-infective Cryptosporidium hominis and the Cryptosporidium parvum "bovine" genotype oocysts, the oocysts isolated from kangaroo feces were identified as the Cryptosporidium "marsupial" genotype I or "marsupial" genotype II. Kangaroos are the predominant large mammal inhabiting Australian watersheds and are potentially a significant source of Cryptosporidium contamination of drinking water reservoirs. However, this host population was predominantly shedding the marsupial-derived genotypes, which to date have been identified only in marsupial host species.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=26844563180&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1128/AEM.71.10.6159-6164.2005

DO - 10.1128/AEM.71.10.6159-6164.2005

M3 - Article

VL - 71

SP - 6159

EP - 6164

JO - Applied and Environmental Microbiology

T2 - Applied and Environmental Microbiology

JF - Applied and Environmental Microbiology

SN - 0099-2240

IS - 10

ER -