'People just don't care': practices of text messaging in the presence of others

Jayde Cahir, Justine Lloyd

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

The demands of flexible labour and the technologization of social networks are currently being felt in profound shifts in the ways in which we spend time with others. This article analyses the everyday communicative practices of adults living in Sydney surrounding their use of text messaging in shared social spaces. Asking the research participants when, how and why they rely on text messaging exposes increasingly routine transgressions of boundaries between different social spheres. While participants were acutely aware of largely unspoken social norms and expectations attached to mobile phone use in the presence of others, they themselves strategically used text messages to create layers of intimacy within shared social spaces. We explore the implications of this tension by highlighting how rituals of social interaction are cared about by social actors but play into a wider sense of the abandonment of care for the presence of others.

LanguageEnglish
Pages703-719
Number of pages17
JournalMedia, Culture and Society
Volume37
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 11 Jul 2015

Fingerprint

Text messaging
social space
Mobile phones
social actor
Personnel
Social Norms
intimacy
religious behavior
social network
labor
interaction

Cite this

@article{c5b0671cc9174e47a2741c1aa4642c34,
title = "'People just don't care': practices of text messaging in the presence of others",
abstract = "The demands of flexible labour and the technologization of social networks are currently being felt in profound shifts in the ways in which we spend time with others. This article analyses the everyday communicative practices of adults living in Sydney surrounding their use of text messaging in shared social spaces. Asking the research participants when, how and why they rely on text messaging exposes increasingly routine transgressions of boundaries between different social spheres. While participants were acutely aware of largely unspoken social norms and expectations attached to mobile phone use in the presence of others, they themselves strategically used text messages to create layers of intimacy within shared social spaces. We explore the implications of this tension by highlighting how rituals of social interaction are cared about by social actors but play into a wider sense of the abandonment of care for the presence of others.",
author = "Jayde Cahir and Justine Lloyd",
year = "2015",
month = "7",
day = "11",
doi = "10.1177/0163443715577242",
language = "English",
volume = "37",
pages = "703--719",
journal = "Media, Culture and Society",
issn = "0163-4437",
publisher = "SAGE Publications",
number = "5",

}

'People just don't care' : practices of text messaging in the presence of others. / Cahir, Jayde; Lloyd, Justine.

In: Media, Culture and Society, Vol. 37, No. 5, 11.07.2015, p. 703-719.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - 'People just don't care'

T2 - Media, Culture and Society

AU - Cahir, Jayde

AU - Lloyd, Justine

PY - 2015/7/11

Y1 - 2015/7/11

N2 - The demands of flexible labour and the technologization of social networks are currently being felt in profound shifts in the ways in which we spend time with others. This article analyses the everyday communicative practices of adults living in Sydney surrounding their use of text messaging in shared social spaces. Asking the research participants when, how and why they rely on text messaging exposes increasingly routine transgressions of boundaries between different social spheres. While participants were acutely aware of largely unspoken social norms and expectations attached to mobile phone use in the presence of others, they themselves strategically used text messages to create layers of intimacy within shared social spaces. We explore the implications of this tension by highlighting how rituals of social interaction are cared about by social actors but play into a wider sense of the abandonment of care for the presence of others.

AB - The demands of flexible labour and the technologization of social networks are currently being felt in profound shifts in the ways in which we spend time with others. This article analyses the everyday communicative practices of adults living in Sydney surrounding their use of text messaging in shared social spaces. Asking the research participants when, how and why they rely on text messaging exposes increasingly routine transgressions of boundaries between different social spheres. While participants were acutely aware of largely unspoken social norms and expectations attached to mobile phone use in the presence of others, they themselves strategically used text messages to create layers of intimacy within shared social spaces. We explore the implications of this tension by highlighting how rituals of social interaction are cared about by social actors but play into a wider sense of the abandonment of care for the presence of others.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84936773842&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/0163443715577242

DO - 10.1177/0163443715577242

M3 - Article

VL - 37

SP - 703

EP - 719

JO - Media, Culture and Society

JF - Media, Culture and Society

SN - 0163-4437

IS - 5

ER -