Perceived GPS use and weather-related decision strategies among pilots

Mark Wiggins*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study sought to examine the relation between visually rated pilots' perceived use of global positioning systems (GPS) as a primary source of navigation and their perceived approach to decision making during encounters with deteriorating weather conditions in flight. A total of 177 pilots completed a questionnaire in which they were asked to indicate the frequency with which they use GPS as a primary source of navigation, the decision strategy that is most like the strategy that they engage during in-flight weather-related decision making, and their perception of the significance of 9 weather-related cues as the basis for decision making. Overall, the results revealed a relation between the perceived use of GPS as a primary source of navigation and the use of aspects of prototypical or tactical decision strategies. Relations were also evident between the perceived use of GPS and the perceived significance of weather-related cues. It was concluded that the introduction of advanced technology systems such as GPS may be associated with a qualitative change in the way in which pilots acquire task-related information and formulate decisions. These outcomes are discussed in terms of a number of applied interventions.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)249-264
Number of pages16
JournalInternational Journal of Aviation Psychology
Volume17
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007
Externally publishedYes

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