Perceptions of Worker Participation: The Influence of Job Status and Political Affiliation

Robert Spillane, A. W. Findlay, Kerry Borthwick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The aim of this study was to ascertain the relationship between political affiliation, job status and perceptions of worker participation. The survey sought to establish the level of support for immediate and distant forms of participation and the con sequences which might be expected to result from increased participation. Percep tions followed predictable political and ideological themes. Employee support for immediate participation was stronger than for distant participation, a finding which supports established trends in the Australian literature. Difficulties of achieving desired changes in the area of worker participation are discussed in relation to the essentially conservative patterns of responses revealed in the survey.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)19-32
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Industrial Relations
Volume24
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1982

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