Perceptual retuning or perceptual bias?

Investigating lexically guided learning across a phoneme boundary

Mona M. Faris, Michael D. Tyler

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contribution

Abstract

Lexically guided perceptual learning studies have shown that speakers use their knowledge of phonemes in words to retune existing phonemic categories in response to different pronunciations. In a previous study, the authors tested whether lexically guided retuning could occur across a native category boundary, that is, when words were pronounced with an incorrect native phoneme. Monolingual Australian-English listeners completed a training phase followed by a visual lexical decision task with cross-modal priming. For participants who were trained to perceive /θ/ as /f/, /θ/-bearing auditory stimuli subsequently primed visual f-targets but not stargets, consistent with training, but those in the /θ/=/s/ training group also showed a tendency for priming in the same
direction. Here we tested whether priming would occur for the same cross-modal priming task in the absence of training. Results demonstrated a similar priming effect to that of the previous study, suggesting that the priming effects were due to a pre-existing bias to perceive /θ/ as /f/. Taken together, the two studies suggest that lexically guided retuning may not be possible across a native phoneme boundary.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 14th Australasian International Conference on Speech Science and Technology
Pages169-172
Number of pages4
Publication statusPublished - 2012
Externally publishedYes
EventAustralasian International Conference on Speech Science and Technology (14th : 2012) - Sydney
Duration: 3 Dec 20126 Dec 2012

Conference

ConferenceAustralasian International Conference on Speech Science and Technology (14th : 2012)
CitySydney
Period3/12/126/12/12

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  • Cite this

    Faris, M. M., & Tyler, M. D. (2012). Perceptual retuning or perceptual bias? Investigating lexically guided learning across a phoneme boundary. In Proceedings of the 14th Australasian International Conference on Speech Science and Technology (pp. 169-172)