Perceptual vowel space for Australian English lax vowels: 1988 and 2004

Robert Mannell

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference proceeding contributionpeer-review

    Abstract

    This paper examines changes in the perception of Australian English lax vowels between 1988 and 2004. In each of the years 1988 and 2004, 20 phonetically-trained native speakers of Australian English were presented with 224 different randomised, synthesised hVd tokens. The vowels differed according to their F1 and F2 values (all possible multiples of 100 Hz within a designated "male" vowel space). Half the vowels were "long" vowels (300 ms) and the other half were "short" vowels (150 ms). Subjects were given a forced-choice closed set task. They were told to concentrate on the vowel in each token and to label it with the symbol for the closest Australian English vowel phoneme. The responses for the "short" vowel plane were then plotted on a vowel perceptual contour map in F1/F2 formant space. Visual examination of the two resulting maps revealed apparent changes in the perceptual boundaries between all adjacent pairs of lax vowels. χ² analysis of 1988 versus 2004 responses for each vowel at each data point on the vowel space revealed significant changes in perceptual patterns at the perceptual boundaries between four pairs of adjacent vowels (/ɪ/ and /e/, /e/ and /æ/, /æ/ and /ʌ/, /ɒ/ and /ʊ/). Both an independent samples t-test and a MANOVA test examined the pattern of subject response means for each vowel and showed a significant change in the mean response between 1988 and 2004 for /æ/, /ʌ/ and /ɒ/.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationProceedings of the 10th Australian international conference on speech science and technology
    EditorsSteve Cassidy, Felicity Cox, Rober Mannell, Sallyanne Palethorpe
    Place of PublicationCanberra
    PublisherAustralian Speech Science and Technology Association
    Pages221-226
    Number of pages6
    ISBN (Print)0958194610
    Publication statusPublished - 2004
    EventAustralian International Conference on Speech Science and Technology (10th : 2004) - Sydney
    Duration: 8 Dec 200410 Dec 2004

    Conference

    ConferenceAustralian International Conference on Speech Science and Technology (10th : 2004)
    CitySydney
    Period8/12/0410/12/04

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