Performance enhancement of a dielectric barrier discharge vacuum-ultraviolet photon source using short-pulsed electrical excitation

Robert J. Carman, Noah T. Goldberg, Stuart C. Hansen, Nigel Gore, Deborah M. Kane

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

We have studied the electrical and optical characteristics of an air-cooled argon excimer vacuum-ultraviolet lamp ( λ∼126 nm) excited by a dielectric barrier discharge powered by: 1) pulsed or 2) sinusoidal high-voltage drivers from 32 to 100 kHz. Compared to sinusoidal excitation, pulsed excitation gives nearly ∼2× higher vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) output and electrical-to-VUV conversion efficiency at high pressure (800–900 mbar). Visually, the pulse-driven plasma is spatially homogeneous, whereas for sinusoidal excitation the plasma becomes filamentary at higher pressure and/or frequency. Spectral emission is highly monochromatic with most of the output in the desired VUV band ( λ=115 –140 nm). With the lamp running at pressure >700 mbar and power loadings >1.6 W/cm3, a sharp spike in VUV output was consistently seen at turn-on. We believe that transient phenomena or favorable initial conditions may be partly responsible for this VUV spike, although the equilibrium VUV output appears to be limited due to thermal dissipation, gas heating, and associated loss of gas from the active region. We propose that we may be observing the same intrinsic VUV spiking phenomena as reported in liquid nitrogen-cooled Xe, Kr, and Ar excimer lamps by Gerasimov et al. More importantly, we believe ours is the first such observation reported for an excimer VUV lamp operating near room temperature. This VUV spiking behavior raises the prospect that designs with improved thermal management may achieve even higher VUV power and efficiency.

LanguageEnglish
Pages90-102
Number of pages13
JournalIEEE Transactions on Plasma Science
Volume46
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2018

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vacuum
augmentation
photons
excitation
luminaires
excimers
spiking
output
high vacuum
spikes
spectral emission
liquid nitrogen
high voltages
dissipation
argon
air
room temperature
pulses
gases

Cite this

@article{1f06d6589d2e4c73bdae20eae0652290,
title = "Performance enhancement of a dielectric barrier discharge vacuum-ultraviolet photon source using short-pulsed electrical excitation",
abstract = "We have studied the electrical and optical characteristics of an air-cooled argon excimer vacuum-ultraviolet lamp ( λ∼126 nm) excited by a dielectric barrier discharge powered by: 1) pulsed or 2) sinusoidal high-voltage drivers from 32 to 100 kHz. Compared to sinusoidal excitation, pulsed excitation gives nearly ∼2× higher vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) output and electrical-to-VUV conversion efficiency at high pressure (800–900 mbar). Visually, the pulse-driven plasma is spatially homogeneous, whereas for sinusoidal excitation the plasma becomes filamentary at higher pressure and/or frequency. Spectral emission is highly monochromatic with most of the output in the desired VUV band ( λ=115 –140 nm). With the lamp running at pressure >700 mbar and power loadings >1.6 W/cm3, a sharp spike in VUV output was consistently seen at turn-on. We believe that transient phenomena or favorable initial conditions may be partly responsible for this VUV spike, although the equilibrium VUV output appears to be limited due to thermal dissipation, gas heating, and associated loss of gas from the active region. We propose that we may be observing the same intrinsic VUV spiking phenomena as reported in liquid nitrogen-cooled Xe, Kr, and Ar excimer lamps by Gerasimov et al. More importantly, we believe ours is the first such observation reported for an excimer VUV lamp operating near room temperature. This VUV spiking behavior raises the prospect that designs with improved thermal management may achieve even higher VUV power and efficiency.",
keywords = "Argon, Discharges (electric), Electron tubes, Glass, Heating systems, Ionization, light sources, photoionization, Plasmas, plasmas, spectroscopy, ultraviolet generation.",
author = "Carman, {Robert J.} and Goldberg, {Noah T.} and Hansen, {Stuart C.} and Nigel Gore and Kane, {Deborah M.}",
year = "2018",
month = "1",
doi = "10.1109/TPS.2017.2776914",
language = "English",
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pages = "90--102",
journal = "IEEE Transactions on Plasma Science",
issn = "0093-3813",
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Performance enhancement of a dielectric barrier discharge vacuum-ultraviolet photon source using short-pulsed electrical excitation. / Carman, Robert J.; Goldberg, Noah T.; Hansen, Stuart C.; Gore, Nigel; Kane, Deborah M.

In: IEEE Transactions on Plasma Science, Vol. 46, No. 1, 01.2018, p. 90-102.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Performance enhancement of a dielectric barrier discharge vacuum-ultraviolet photon source using short-pulsed electrical excitation

AU - Carman,Robert J.

AU - Goldberg,Noah T.

AU - Hansen,Stuart C.

AU - Gore,Nigel

AU - Kane,Deborah M.

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N2 - We have studied the electrical and optical characteristics of an air-cooled argon excimer vacuum-ultraviolet lamp ( λ∼126 nm) excited by a dielectric barrier discharge powered by: 1) pulsed or 2) sinusoidal high-voltage drivers from 32 to 100 kHz. Compared to sinusoidal excitation, pulsed excitation gives nearly ∼2× higher vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) output and electrical-to-VUV conversion efficiency at high pressure (800–900 mbar). Visually, the pulse-driven plasma is spatially homogeneous, whereas for sinusoidal excitation the plasma becomes filamentary at higher pressure and/or frequency. Spectral emission is highly monochromatic with most of the output in the desired VUV band ( λ=115 –140 nm). With the lamp running at pressure >700 mbar and power loadings >1.6 W/cm3, a sharp spike in VUV output was consistently seen at turn-on. We believe that transient phenomena or favorable initial conditions may be partly responsible for this VUV spike, although the equilibrium VUV output appears to be limited due to thermal dissipation, gas heating, and associated loss of gas from the active region. We propose that we may be observing the same intrinsic VUV spiking phenomena as reported in liquid nitrogen-cooled Xe, Kr, and Ar excimer lamps by Gerasimov et al. More importantly, we believe ours is the first such observation reported for an excimer VUV lamp operating near room temperature. This VUV spiking behavior raises the prospect that designs with improved thermal management may achieve even higher VUV power and efficiency.

AB - We have studied the electrical and optical characteristics of an air-cooled argon excimer vacuum-ultraviolet lamp ( λ∼126 nm) excited by a dielectric barrier discharge powered by: 1) pulsed or 2) sinusoidal high-voltage drivers from 32 to 100 kHz. Compared to sinusoidal excitation, pulsed excitation gives nearly ∼2× higher vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) output and electrical-to-VUV conversion efficiency at high pressure (800–900 mbar). Visually, the pulse-driven plasma is spatially homogeneous, whereas for sinusoidal excitation the plasma becomes filamentary at higher pressure and/or frequency. Spectral emission is highly monochromatic with most of the output in the desired VUV band ( λ=115 –140 nm). With the lamp running at pressure >700 mbar and power loadings >1.6 W/cm3, a sharp spike in VUV output was consistently seen at turn-on. We believe that transient phenomena or favorable initial conditions may be partly responsible for this VUV spike, although the equilibrium VUV output appears to be limited due to thermal dissipation, gas heating, and associated loss of gas from the active region. We propose that we may be observing the same intrinsic VUV spiking phenomena as reported in liquid nitrogen-cooled Xe, Kr, and Ar excimer lamps by Gerasimov et al. More importantly, we believe ours is the first such observation reported for an excimer VUV lamp operating near room temperature. This VUV spiking behavior raises the prospect that designs with improved thermal management may achieve even higher VUV power and efficiency.

KW - Argon

KW - Discharges (electric)

KW - Electron tubes

KW - Glass

KW - Heating systems

KW - Ionization

KW - light sources

KW - photoionization

KW - Plasmas

KW - plasmas

KW - spectroscopy

KW - ultraviolet generation.

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U2 - 10.1109/TPS.2017.2776914

DO - 10.1109/TPS.2017.2776914

M3 - Article

VL - 46

SP - 90

EP - 102

JO - IEEE Transactions on Plasma Science

T2 - IEEE Transactions on Plasma Science

JF - IEEE Transactions on Plasma Science

SN - 0093-3813

IS - 1

ER -