Phonological Effects in Visual Word Recognition: Investigating the Impact of Feedback Activation

Penny M. Pexman*, Stephen J. Lupker, Lorraine D. Reggin

*Corresponding author for this work

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    42 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    P. M. Pexman, S. J. Lupker, and D. Jared (2001) reported longer response latencies in lexical decision tasks (LDTs) for homophones (e.g., maid) than for nonhomophones, and attributed this homophone effect to orthographic competition created by feedback activation from phonology. In the current study, two predictions of this feedback account were tested: (a) In LDT, observe homophone effects should be observed but not regularity or homograph effects because most exception words (e.g., pint) and homographs (e.g., wind) have different feedback characteristics than homophones do, and (b) in a phonological LDT ("does it sound like a word?"), regularity and homograph effects should be observed but not homophone effects. Both predictions were confirmed. These results support the claim that feedback activation from phonology plays a significant role in visual word recognition.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)572-584
    Number of pages13
    JournalJournal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition
    Volume28
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - May 2002

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