Physical activity level and the perceived barriers to physical activity participation in children with osteogenesis imperfecta

T. Jones, I. Theophile, A. Price, C. Munns, V. Pacey

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractResearch

Abstract

Aims: To quantify the level of physical activity performed by children with Osteogenesis Imperfecta and identify barriers to physical activity as perceived by children and their parents.
Design: Observational Study
Method: Fifty-four children aged 7-17 years, with a confirmed diagnosis of mild, moderate or severe Osteogenesis Imperfecta were recruited for this study. The Actigraph GT3XE was used to record average daily moderate-vigorous physical activity, and the ActivPAL3 was used to record average daily time spent sitting, standing, stepping and average daily step count. Child and parent specific questionnaires examined barriers to physical activity.
Results: Wear time eligibility for the Actigraph GT3XE and ActivPAL3 was achieved in 28 and 32 children respectively. Only 46% of participants met the current guidelines of 60 minutes/day of moderate-vigorous physical activity, and 25% of participants achieved the recommended average for children of a minimum of 12,000 steps/day. Health professional recommendations to restrict physical activity was the most frequently child-reported barrier (73%), and the second most frequently parent-reported barrier (70%).The most frequently parent-reported barrier was that physical activity will cause their child pain (76%). There was no association between overall frequency of barriers reported and physical activity.
Conclusions/Key Practice Points: This is the largest study examining physical activity in children with Osteogenesis Imperfecta, with most children not reaching national guidelines. Health professional recommendation to restrict physical activity is perceived as a significant barrier to physical activity participation. Facilitation of safe physical activity for children with Osteogenesis Imperfecta, while continuing to minimise fracture risk, warrants further consideration.

Conference

ConferenceAustralian Physiotherapy Association Conference Momentum 2017
CountryAustralia
CitySydney
Period19/10/1721/10/17

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Osteogenesis Imperfecta
Exercise
Guidelines
Health

Cite this

Jones, T., Theophile, I., Price, A., Munns, C., & Pacey, V. (2017). Physical activity level and the perceived barriers to physical activity participation in children with osteogenesis imperfecta. Abstract from Australian Physiotherapy Association Conference Momentum 2017, Sydney, Australia.
Jones, T. ; Theophile, I. ; Price, A. ; Munns, C. ; Pacey, V. / Physical activity level and the perceived barriers to physical activity participation in children with osteogenesis imperfecta. Abstract from Australian Physiotherapy Association Conference Momentum 2017, Sydney, Australia.1 p.
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abstract = "Aims: To quantify the level of physical activity performed by children with Osteogenesis Imperfecta and identify barriers to physical activity as perceived by children and their parents. Design: Observational StudyMethod: Fifty-four children aged 7-17 years, with a confirmed diagnosis of mild, moderate or severe Osteogenesis Imperfecta were recruited for this study. The Actigraph GT3XE was used to record average daily moderate-vigorous physical activity, and the ActivPAL3 was used to record average daily time spent sitting, standing, stepping and average daily step count. Child and parent specific questionnaires examined barriers to physical activity. Results: Wear time eligibility for the Actigraph GT3XE and ActivPAL3 was achieved in 28 and 32 children respectively. Only 46{\%} of participants met the current guidelines of 60 minutes/day of moderate-vigorous physical activity, and 25{\%} of participants achieved the recommended average for children of a minimum of 12,000 steps/day. Health professional recommendations to restrict physical activity was the most frequently child-reported barrier (73{\%}), and the second most frequently parent-reported barrier (70{\%}).The most frequently parent-reported barrier was that physical activity will cause their child pain (76{\%}). There was no association between overall frequency of barriers reported and physical activity.Conclusions/Key Practice Points: This is the largest study examining physical activity in children with Osteogenesis Imperfecta, with most children not reaching national guidelines. Health professional recommendation to restrict physical activity is perceived as a significant barrier to physical activity participation. Facilitation of safe physical activity for children with Osteogenesis Imperfecta, while continuing to minimise fracture risk, warrants further consideration.",
author = "T. Jones and I. Theophile and A. Price and C. Munns and V. Pacey",
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Jones, T, Theophile, I, Price, A, Munns, C & Pacey, V 2017, 'Physical activity level and the perceived barriers to physical activity participation in children with osteogenesis imperfecta' Australian Physiotherapy Association Conference Momentum 2017, Sydney, Australia, 19/10/17 - 21/10/17, .

Physical activity level and the perceived barriers to physical activity participation in children with osteogenesis imperfecta. / Jones, T.; Theophile, I.; Price, A.; Munns, C.; Pacey, V.

2017. Abstract from Australian Physiotherapy Association Conference Momentum 2017, Sydney, Australia.

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractResearch

TY - CONF

T1 - Physical activity level and the perceived barriers to physical activity participation in children with osteogenesis imperfecta

AU - Jones, T.

AU - Theophile, I.

AU - Price, A.

AU - Munns, C.

AU - Pacey, V.

PY - 2017/10

Y1 - 2017/10

N2 - Aims: To quantify the level of physical activity performed by children with Osteogenesis Imperfecta and identify barriers to physical activity as perceived by children and their parents. Design: Observational StudyMethod: Fifty-four children aged 7-17 years, with a confirmed diagnosis of mild, moderate or severe Osteogenesis Imperfecta were recruited for this study. The Actigraph GT3XE was used to record average daily moderate-vigorous physical activity, and the ActivPAL3 was used to record average daily time spent sitting, standing, stepping and average daily step count. Child and parent specific questionnaires examined barriers to physical activity. Results: Wear time eligibility for the Actigraph GT3XE and ActivPAL3 was achieved in 28 and 32 children respectively. Only 46% of participants met the current guidelines of 60 minutes/day of moderate-vigorous physical activity, and 25% of participants achieved the recommended average for children of a minimum of 12,000 steps/day. Health professional recommendations to restrict physical activity was the most frequently child-reported barrier (73%), and the second most frequently parent-reported barrier (70%).The most frequently parent-reported barrier was that physical activity will cause their child pain (76%). There was no association between overall frequency of barriers reported and physical activity.Conclusions/Key Practice Points: This is the largest study examining physical activity in children with Osteogenesis Imperfecta, with most children not reaching national guidelines. Health professional recommendation to restrict physical activity is perceived as a significant barrier to physical activity participation. Facilitation of safe physical activity for children with Osteogenesis Imperfecta, while continuing to minimise fracture risk, warrants further consideration.

AB - Aims: To quantify the level of physical activity performed by children with Osteogenesis Imperfecta and identify barriers to physical activity as perceived by children and their parents. Design: Observational StudyMethod: Fifty-four children aged 7-17 years, with a confirmed diagnosis of mild, moderate or severe Osteogenesis Imperfecta were recruited for this study. The Actigraph GT3XE was used to record average daily moderate-vigorous physical activity, and the ActivPAL3 was used to record average daily time spent sitting, standing, stepping and average daily step count. Child and parent specific questionnaires examined barriers to physical activity. Results: Wear time eligibility for the Actigraph GT3XE and ActivPAL3 was achieved in 28 and 32 children respectively. Only 46% of participants met the current guidelines of 60 minutes/day of moderate-vigorous physical activity, and 25% of participants achieved the recommended average for children of a minimum of 12,000 steps/day. Health professional recommendations to restrict physical activity was the most frequently child-reported barrier (73%), and the second most frequently parent-reported barrier (70%).The most frequently parent-reported barrier was that physical activity will cause their child pain (76%). There was no association between overall frequency of barriers reported and physical activity.Conclusions/Key Practice Points: This is the largest study examining physical activity in children with Osteogenesis Imperfecta, with most children not reaching national guidelines. Health professional recommendation to restrict physical activity is perceived as a significant barrier to physical activity participation. Facilitation of safe physical activity for children with Osteogenesis Imperfecta, while continuing to minimise fracture risk, warrants further consideration.

M3 - Abstract

ER -

Jones T, Theophile I, Price A, Munns C, Pacey V. Physical activity level and the perceived barriers to physical activity participation in children with osteogenesis imperfecta. 2017. Abstract from Australian Physiotherapy Association Conference Momentum 2017, Sydney, Australia.