Physical activity, obesity and sedentary behaviour and the risks of colon and rectal cancers in the 45 and up study

Carlos Nunez, Visalini Nair-Shalliker, Sam Egger, Freddy Sitas, Adrian Bauman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Background: Obesity and physical activity (PA) are predictors of colon (CC) and rectal (RC) cancers. Prolonged sitting is also emerging as a potential predictor for these cancers. Little knowledge exists about the interactive effects of obesity, PA and prolonged sitting on cancer risk. This analysis assessed independent and interactive effects of PA, body mass index (BMI) and sitting time on CC and RC risks. Methods: This analysis used data from a prospective study of 226,584 participants aged 45 years and over in New South Wales (NSW), Australia, who joined the 45 and Up study between 2006 and 2009. Baseline data were linked with data relating to mortality, cancer registration, hospital admission and Department of Human Services to December 2010. Multivariable Cox regression was used to estimate adjusted hazard ratios (referred to as relative risks, RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (Cis). Statistical significance was defined as p < 0.05. Results: There were 846 and 369 ascertained cases of CC and RC. BMI was positively associated with CC risk (p = 0.003, P-trend = 0.0006) but not with RC. CC risk was increased in participants in the highest BMI quartile (≥29.4-≤50 kg/m2) compared to the lowest (15- < 23.6 kg/m2), (RR = 1.32, 95% CI:1.08-1.63). PA was associated with CC risk (p = 0.02) but not with RC. Specifically, CC risk was lower in individuals partaking in any amount of vigorous activity (time/week) compared to participants with no engagement (RR = 0.78, 95% CI:0.65-0.93). Sitting time was not associated with CC or RC. We found no evidence of interactive effects of PA, BMI and prolonged sitting on cancer risk. Conclusion: This evidence suggests that a healthy weight and vigorous activity are essential to reduce CC risk since these factors may be independent of each other.

LanguageEnglish
Article number325
Pages1-12
Number of pages12
JournalBMC Public Health
Volume18
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 6 Mar 2018

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Rectal Neoplasms
Risk-Taking
Colonic Neoplasms
Obesity
Body Mass Index
Cancer Care Facilities
Neoplasms
South Australia
New South Wales
Hospital Departments
Prospective Studies
Confidence Intervals
Weights and Measures
Mortality

Bibliographical note

Copyright the Author(s) 2018. Version archived for private and non-commercial use with the permission of the author/s and according to publisher conditions. For further rights please contact the publisher.

Keywords

  • Colorectal cancer
  • Obesity
  • Physical activity
  • Prospective study
  • Sedentary behaviour
  • MORTALITY
  • AUSTRALIA
  • METAANALYSIS
  • TIME
  • WOMEN
  • COLORECTAL-CANCER
  • MEN
  • BODY-MASS INDEX
  • COHORT
  • ASSOCIATION

Cite this

Nunez, Carlos ; Nair-Shalliker, Visalini ; Egger, Sam ; Sitas, Freddy ; Bauman, Adrian. / Physical activity, obesity and sedentary behaviour and the risks of colon and rectal cancers in the 45 and up study. In: BMC Public Health. 2018 ; Vol. 18, No. 1. pp. 1-12.
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abstract = "Background: Obesity and physical activity (PA) are predictors of colon (CC) and rectal (RC) cancers. Prolonged sitting is also emerging as a potential predictor for these cancers. Little knowledge exists about the interactive effects of obesity, PA and prolonged sitting on cancer risk. This analysis assessed independent and interactive effects of PA, body mass index (BMI) and sitting time on CC and RC risks. Methods: This analysis used data from a prospective study of 226,584 participants aged 45 years and over in New South Wales (NSW), Australia, who joined the 45 and Up study between 2006 and 2009. Baseline data were linked with data relating to mortality, cancer registration, hospital admission and Department of Human Services to December 2010. Multivariable Cox regression was used to estimate adjusted hazard ratios (referred to as relative risks, RRs) and 95{\%} confidence intervals (Cis). Statistical significance was defined as p < 0.05. Results: There were 846 and 369 ascertained cases of CC and RC. BMI was positively associated with CC risk (p = 0.003, P-trend = 0.0006) but not with RC. CC risk was increased in participants in the highest BMI quartile (≥29.4-≤50 kg/m2) compared to the lowest (15- < 23.6 kg/m2), (RR = 1.32, 95{\%} CI:1.08-1.63). PA was associated with CC risk (p = 0.02) but not with RC. Specifically, CC risk was lower in individuals partaking in any amount of vigorous activity (time/week) compared to participants with no engagement (RR = 0.78, 95{\%} CI:0.65-0.93). Sitting time was not associated with CC or RC. We found no evidence of interactive effects of PA, BMI and prolonged sitting on cancer risk. Conclusion: This evidence suggests that a healthy weight and vigorous activity are essential to reduce CC risk since these factors may be independent of each other.",
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author = "Carlos Nunez and Visalini Nair-Shalliker and Sam Egger and Freddy Sitas and Adrian Bauman",
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Physical activity, obesity and sedentary behaviour and the risks of colon and rectal cancers in the 45 and up study. / Nunez, Carlos; Nair-Shalliker, Visalini; Egger, Sam; Sitas, Freddy; Bauman, Adrian.

In: BMC Public Health, Vol. 18, No. 1, 325, 06.03.2018, p. 1-12.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Physical activity, obesity and sedentary behaviour and the risks of colon and rectal cancers in the 45 and up study

AU - Nunez, Carlos

AU - Nair-Shalliker, Visalini

AU - Egger, Sam

AU - Sitas, Freddy

AU - Bauman, Adrian

N1 - Copyright the Author(s) 2018. Version archived for private and non-commercial use with the permission of the author/s and according to publisher conditions. For further rights please contact the publisher.

PY - 2018/3/6

Y1 - 2018/3/6

N2 - Background: Obesity and physical activity (PA) are predictors of colon (CC) and rectal (RC) cancers. Prolonged sitting is also emerging as a potential predictor for these cancers. Little knowledge exists about the interactive effects of obesity, PA and prolonged sitting on cancer risk. This analysis assessed independent and interactive effects of PA, body mass index (BMI) and sitting time on CC and RC risks. Methods: This analysis used data from a prospective study of 226,584 participants aged 45 years and over in New South Wales (NSW), Australia, who joined the 45 and Up study between 2006 and 2009. Baseline data were linked with data relating to mortality, cancer registration, hospital admission and Department of Human Services to December 2010. Multivariable Cox regression was used to estimate adjusted hazard ratios (referred to as relative risks, RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (Cis). Statistical significance was defined as p < 0.05. Results: There were 846 and 369 ascertained cases of CC and RC. BMI was positively associated with CC risk (p = 0.003, P-trend = 0.0006) but not with RC. CC risk was increased in participants in the highest BMI quartile (≥29.4-≤50 kg/m2) compared to the lowest (15- < 23.6 kg/m2), (RR = 1.32, 95% CI:1.08-1.63). PA was associated with CC risk (p = 0.02) but not with RC. Specifically, CC risk was lower in individuals partaking in any amount of vigorous activity (time/week) compared to participants with no engagement (RR = 0.78, 95% CI:0.65-0.93). Sitting time was not associated with CC or RC. We found no evidence of interactive effects of PA, BMI and prolonged sitting on cancer risk. Conclusion: This evidence suggests that a healthy weight and vigorous activity are essential to reduce CC risk since these factors may be independent of each other.

AB - Background: Obesity and physical activity (PA) are predictors of colon (CC) and rectal (RC) cancers. Prolonged sitting is also emerging as a potential predictor for these cancers. Little knowledge exists about the interactive effects of obesity, PA and prolonged sitting on cancer risk. This analysis assessed independent and interactive effects of PA, body mass index (BMI) and sitting time on CC and RC risks. Methods: This analysis used data from a prospective study of 226,584 participants aged 45 years and over in New South Wales (NSW), Australia, who joined the 45 and Up study between 2006 and 2009. Baseline data were linked with data relating to mortality, cancer registration, hospital admission and Department of Human Services to December 2010. Multivariable Cox regression was used to estimate adjusted hazard ratios (referred to as relative risks, RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (Cis). Statistical significance was defined as p < 0.05. Results: There were 846 and 369 ascertained cases of CC and RC. BMI was positively associated with CC risk (p = 0.003, P-trend = 0.0006) but not with RC. CC risk was increased in participants in the highest BMI quartile (≥29.4-≤50 kg/m2) compared to the lowest (15- < 23.6 kg/m2), (RR = 1.32, 95% CI:1.08-1.63). PA was associated with CC risk (p = 0.02) but not with RC. Specifically, CC risk was lower in individuals partaking in any amount of vigorous activity (time/week) compared to participants with no engagement (RR = 0.78, 95% CI:0.65-0.93). Sitting time was not associated with CC or RC. We found no evidence of interactive effects of PA, BMI and prolonged sitting on cancer risk. Conclusion: This evidence suggests that a healthy weight and vigorous activity are essential to reduce CC risk since these factors may be independent of each other.

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KW - TIME

KW - WOMEN

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KW - COHORT

KW - ASSOCIATION

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