Phytochemical characterization of the Australian (Aboriginal) medicinal plant Dolichandrone heterophylla and influence of selected isolated compounds on human keratinocytes

Thomas Dzeha, Kristian Wende, Manuela Harms, Ju Ju Wilson, Jim Kohen, Subra Vemulpad, Joanne Jamie, Ulrike Lindequist

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

The Miriwoong Aboriginal people of Eastern Kimberley, Western Australia use the leaves and bark of Dolichandrone heterophylla (R. Br.) F. Muell., Bigoniaceae, to treat sores, rashes, grazes, scabies, boils and wounds. Bioassay guided fractionation of an aqueous extract of the leaves and twigs led to the isolation of the known compounds caffeic acid, the phenylethanoids isoacteoside (1) and acteoside (2), and the flavonoids chrysoeriol and luteolin. The structures of these compounds were determined using mass spectrometric and 1D- and 2D-NMR spectroscopic data and verified by comparison with those in the literature. Studies of the effect of isoacteoside (1) and chrysoeriol on HaCaT keratinocytes using the MTT assay revealed that chrysoeriol had growth inhibitory properties towards the cell line in a dose dependent manner (IC 50 = 31 μM) whereas 1 was well tolerated up to 50 μM. On the other hand, 1 inhibited the growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

LanguageEnglish
Pages1387-1394
Number of pages8
JournalNatural Product Communications
Volume3
Issue number9
Publication statusPublished - 2008

Fingerprint

scabies
indigenous peoples
luteolin
keratinocytes
Phytochemicals
plant damage
caffeic acid
Medicinal Plants
Keratinocytes
Pseudomonas aeruginosa
leaf extracts
Western Australia
phytopharmaceuticals
medicinal plants
inhibitory concentration 50
fractionation
bark
flavonoids
bioassays
cell lines

Cite this

@article{6861db2a7f844df08e9597db1a2d9918,
title = "Phytochemical characterization of the Australian (Aboriginal) medicinal plant Dolichandrone heterophylla and influence of selected isolated compounds on human keratinocytes",
abstract = "The Miriwoong Aboriginal people of Eastern Kimberley, Western Australia use the leaves and bark of Dolichandrone heterophylla (R. Br.) F. Muell., Bigoniaceae, to treat sores, rashes, grazes, scabies, boils and wounds. Bioassay guided fractionation of an aqueous extract of the leaves and twigs led to the isolation of the known compounds caffeic acid, the phenylethanoids isoacteoside (1) and acteoside (2), and the flavonoids chrysoeriol and luteolin. The structures of these compounds were determined using mass spectrometric and 1D- and 2D-NMR spectroscopic data and verified by comparison with those in the literature. Studies of the effect of isoacteoside (1) and chrysoeriol on HaCaT keratinocytes using the MTT assay revealed that chrysoeriol had growth inhibitory properties towards the cell line in a dose dependent manner (IC 50 = 31 μM) whereas 1 was well tolerated up to 50 μM. On the other hand, 1 inhibited the growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.",
author = "Thomas Dzeha and Kristian Wende and Manuela Harms and Wilson, {Ju Ju} and Jim Kohen and Subra Vemulpad and Joanne Jamie and Ulrike Lindequist",
year = "2008",
language = "English",
volume = "3",
pages = "1387--1394",
journal = "Natural Product Communications",
issn = "1934-578X",
publisher = "Natural Product Communications",
number = "9",

}

Phytochemical characterization of the Australian (Aboriginal) medicinal plant Dolichandrone heterophylla and influence of selected isolated compounds on human keratinocytes. / Dzeha, Thomas; Wende, Kristian; Harms, Manuela; Wilson, Ju Ju; Kohen, Jim; Vemulpad, Subra; Jamie, Joanne; Lindequist, Ulrike.

In: Natural Product Communications, Vol. 3, No. 9, 2008, p. 1387-1394.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Phytochemical characterization of the Australian (Aboriginal) medicinal plant Dolichandrone heterophylla and influence of selected isolated compounds on human keratinocytes

AU - Dzeha, Thomas

AU - Wende, Kristian

AU - Harms, Manuela

AU - Wilson, Ju Ju

AU - Kohen, Jim

AU - Vemulpad, Subra

AU - Jamie, Joanne

AU - Lindequist, Ulrike

PY - 2008

Y1 - 2008

N2 - The Miriwoong Aboriginal people of Eastern Kimberley, Western Australia use the leaves and bark of Dolichandrone heterophylla (R. Br.) F. Muell., Bigoniaceae, to treat sores, rashes, grazes, scabies, boils and wounds. Bioassay guided fractionation of an aqueous extract of the leaves and twigs led to the isolation of the known compounds caffeic acid, the phenylethanoids isoacteoside (1) and acteoside (2), and the flavonoids chrysoeriol and luteolin. The structures of these compounds were determined using mass spectrometric and 1D- and 2D-NMR spectroscopic data and verified by comparison with those in the literature. Studies of the effect of isoacteoside (1) and chrysoeriol on HaCaT keratinocytes using the MTT assay revealed that chrysoeriol had growth inhibitory properties towards the cell line in a dose dependent manner (IC 50 = 31 μM) whereas 1 was well tolerated up to 50 μM. On the other hand, 1 inhibited the growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

AB - The Miriwoong Aboriginal people of Eastern Kimberley, Western Australia use the leaves and bark of Dolichandrone heterophylla (R. Br.) F. Muell., Bigoniaceae, to treat sores, rashes, grazes, scabies, boils and wounds. Bioassay guided fractionation of an aqueous extract of the leaves and twigs led to the isolation of the known compounds caffeic acid, the phenylethanoids isoacteoside (1) and acteoside (2), and the flavonoids chrysoeriol and luteolin. The structures of these compounds were determined using mass spectrometric and 1D- and 2D-NMR spectroscopic data and verified by comparison with those in the literature. Studies of the effect of isoacteoside (1) and chrysoeriol on HaCaT keratinocytes using the MTT assay revealed that chrysoeriol had growth inhibitory properties towards the cell line in a dose dependent manner (IC 50 = 31 μM) whereas 1 was well tolerated up to 50 μM. On the other hand, 1 inhibited the growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77954121715&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 3

SP - 1387

EP - 1394

JO - Natural Product Communications

T2 - Natural Product Communications

JF - Natural Product Communications

SN - 1934-578X

IS - 9

ER -