Phytochemical profile and antibacterial and antioxidant activities of medicinal plants used by Aboriginal people of New South Wales, Australia

Kaisarun Akter, Emma C. Barnes, Joseph J. Brophy, David Harrington, Yaegl Community Elders, Subramanyam R. Vemulpad, Joanne F. Jamie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Aboriginal people of Australia possess a rich knowledge on the use of medicinal plants for the treatment of sores, wounds, and skin infections, ailments which impose a high global disease burden and require effective treatments. The antibacterial and antioxidant activities and phytochemical contents of extracts, obtained from eight medicinal plants used by Aboriginal people of New South Wales, Australia, for the treatment of skin related ailments, were assessed to add value to and provide an evidence-base for their traditional uses. Extracts of Acacia implexa, Acacia falcata, Cassytha glabella, Eucalyptus haemastoma, Smilax glyciphylla, Sterculia quadrifida, and Syncarpia glomulifera were evaluated. All extracts except that of S. quadrifida showed activity against sensitive and multidrug resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus with minimum inhibitory concentration values ranging from 7.81 to 1000 μg/mL. The sap of E. haemastoma and bark of A. implexa possessed high total phenolic contents (TPC) and strong DPPH radical scavenging abilities. A positive correlation was observed between TPC and free radical scavenging ability. GC-MS analysis of the n-hexane extract of S. glomulifera identified known antimicrobial compounds. Together, these results support the traditional uses of the examined plants for the treatment of skin related ailments and infections by Aboriginal people of New South Wales, Australia.

LanguageEnglish
Article number4683059
Pages1-14
Number of pages14
JournalEvidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016

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South Australia
New South Wales
Phytochemicals
Medicinal Plants
Acacia
Antioxidants
Skin
Sterculia
Smilax
Eucalyptus
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Wound Infection
Free Radicals
Staphylococcus aureus
Infection

Bibliographical note

Copyright the Author(s) 2016. Version archived for private and non-commercial use with the permission of the author/s and according to publisher conditions. For further rights please contact the publisher.

Cite this

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abstract = "Aboriginal people of Australia possess a rich knowledge on the use of medicinal plants for the treatment of sores, wounds, and skin infections, ailments which impose a high global disease burden and require effective treatments. The antibacterial and antioxidant activities and phytochemical contents of extracts, obtained from eight medicinal plants used by Aboriginal people of New South Wales, Australia, for the treatment of skin related ailments, were assessed to add value to and provide an evidence-base for their traditional uses. Extracts of Acacia implexa, Acacia falcata, Cassytha glabella, Eucalyptus haemastoma, Smilax glyciphylla, Sterculia quadrifida, and Syncarpia glomulifera were evaluated. All extracts except that of S. quadrifida showed activity against sensitive and multidrug resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus with minimum inhibitory concentration values ranging from 7.81 to 1000 μg/mL. The sap of E. haemastoma and bark of A. implexa possessed high total phenolic contents (TPC) and strong DPPH radical scavenging abilities. A positive correlation was observed between TPC and free radical scavenging ability. GC-MS analysis of the n-hexane extract of S. glomulifera identified known antimicrobial compounds. Together, these results support the traditional uses of the examined plants for the treatment of skin related ailments and infections by Aboriginal people of New South Wales, Australia.",
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Phytochemical profile and antibacterial and antioxidant activities of medicinal plants used by Aboriginal people of New South Wales, Australia. / Akter, Kaisarun; Barnes, Emma C.; Brophy, Joseph J.; Harrington, David; Community Elders, Yaegl; Vemulpad, Subramanyam R.; Jamie, Joanne F.

In: Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Vol. 2016, 4683059, 2016, p. 1-14.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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